Archive for January, 2009

February 2009 – Section Meeting Information

EMERGENCY ELECTRIC GENERATORS FOR HOME – THE TECHNICAL, THE DIFFERENCES,
AND HOW TO CHOOSE

DATE :     Thursday, February 26, 2009
PLACE :  Raffel’s – 10160 Reading Road (see below for directions)
TIME :      5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. –  Social Time
                 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. –  Dinner
                 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. –  Presentation
 
COST FOR DINNER: $10.00 per person – REGARDLESS OF MEMBERSHIP OR MEMBERSHIP GRADE!

NOTE:  DINNERS ARE ALWAYS OPTIONAL – YOU MAY ATTEND THE PROGRAM ONLY. 

MENU SELECTIONS:   Spinach Stuffed Tomato, Pan Fried Tilapia with Lemon Caper Sauce, Beef Stroganoff, Steamed Fresh Broccoli, Buttered Noodles, Tossed Salad, Dinner Rolls and Butter, Apple & Peach Cobblers, Coffee, Tea, Iced Tea, Soft Drinks. There is also a bar available for the purchase of alcoholic drinks.

LOCATION:  Raffel’s is located at 10160 Reading Road, south of Glendale-Milford Road on the east side of Reading. Take I-75 to the Glendale-Milford Rd. Exit, go east on Glendale-Milford Road approximately ¾ of a mile to Reading Rd. and turn right on Reading.

RESERVATIONS:  Please email Fred Nadeau for reservations at mailto:fnadeau1@earthlink.net (preferred) or call the Section Voice Mail at 513-629-9380 by Noon, Tuesday, February 24, 2009 if you plan to attend. Please leave your Name, IEEE Member Number, and a daytime telephone number.

PE CREDITS: Depending on the subject matter, attendance at IEEE Cincinnati Section Meetings now qualifies the attendee for Professional Development Hours towards renewal of Professional Engineers Licenses. Required documentation will be available following the meeting!  The Section Meetings also provide a great opportunity to network with fellow engineers in the area.

ABOUT THE MEETING:  Our speaker this month, Vic Spang of Buckeye Power Sales Company, will share his technical knowledge and the information we need for choosing home generation for ourselves.  Given our recent outages with ice and wind, the demand for home generation has been increasing.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER:  Mr. Spang has over 31 years in the generator business – from technical design to sales – working with Engineers and Architects on single and multiple paralleling systems.  He also serves on a Kohler Distributor Industrial sub-committee.  Buckeye Power Sales Company has been supplying quality generator systems for factories, hospitals, nursing homes, public buildings, water and sewage projects, and home standby for 60 years.

January 29th, 2009

February 2009 – Membership News

NEW MEMBERS
The following individuals are IEEE members who are new to our Section:

Steven M. Bak
Nancy Marie Connelly
Benjamin Corrado
Jim Ray Gross
Alero Boritsegin Jakpa
Alexander Wayne Juncker
Thomas Gerard McLaughlin
Alex Meier
Obioma Nwigwe
Diana Treece
Lee Watson
Brandon Williams

We wish to welcome these new members to the Cincinnati Section!!!

January 29th, 2009

February 2009 – History

Scanning the Past: A History of Electrical Engineering from the Past
Submitted by Bob Morrison, Editor
Copyright 1995 IEEE. Reprinted with permission from the IEEE publication, “Scanning the Past” which covers a reprint of an article appearing in the Proceedings of the IEEE Vol. 83, No. 10, October 1995.

Greenleaf W. Pickard and the Eclipse Network

Seventy years ago this month, the PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS (IRE) included a paper by Greenleaf W. Pickard on the effect of a recent solar eclipse on radio reception. At the time he was a consulting engineer with the Wireless Specialty Apparatus Company of Boston, MA, and a past president of the IRE. He was the author or coauthor of 15 Proceedings papers published between 1920 and 1934.

Pickard was born in 1877 in Portland, ME. The well known poet, John Greenleaf Whittier, was his great uncle. Pickard attended the Lawrence Scientific School at Harvard University and also took classes at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1899 he received a grant from the Smithsonian Institution to support his wireless research at the Blue Hill Observatory in Milton, MA. He joined the American Wireless Telegraph and Telephone Company in 1901 and installed wireless apparatus to report the Americas Cup yacht competition that year.

Pickard worked for the American Telephone and Telegraph Company from 1902 to 1906. During this period, he experimented with wireless telephony and also observed some of Reginald Fessenden’s tests of a radio alternator. Pickard tested a large number of minerals in an effort to discover the most effective contact detector of radio waves. He found that a sample of fused silicon obtained from the Westinghouse Electric Company produced excellent results and he received a patent on a silicon crystal detector in 1906. Reportedly, he tested more than 30 000 combinations of materials for detectors.

In 1907, Pickard and two associates organized the Wireless Specialty Apparatus Company to market his patented detectors, one of which was called Perikon, an acronym for “perfect Pickard contact.” Pickard was a member of both the Society of Wireless Telegraph Engineers and the Wireless Institute when they merged to form the IRE in 1912. He served as the second president of the IRE in 1913. During World War I, he investigated ways to mitigate static interference at a Navy radio installation at Otter Cliffs, ME. He published an IRE paper on the use of directional antennas to reduce static in October 1920. He speculated that much of the static was caused by solar phenomena.

In his October 1925 paper, Pickard reported that he had organized an “eclipse network” involving both commercial and experimental stations in an effort to measure the effects of the solar eclipse of January 24, 1925, on radio reception. Several stations had transmitted continuous wave signals at frequencies ranging from 57 kHz to 4 MHz. Observers including Alfred N. Goldsmith had made graphical recordings at various receiving sites. Pickard was awarded the IRE Medal of Honor in 1926 in recognition of his many contributions to radio science.

Pickard continued to investigate propagation of radio waves and served as a consultant to the Radio Corporation of America and other clients during the 1930′ s. He published an IRE paper in July 1931 on the effect of meteor showers on propagation. He also explored the effect of sunspots and atmospheric pressure and temperature on reception over a wide range of frequencies. He became a Fellow of the Radio Club of America and was awarded its Armstrong Medal in 1941. He died in 1956 at age 78.

James E. Brittain
School of History , Technology and Society
Georgia Institute of Technology

January 29th, 2009

February 2009 – IEEE News

Washington, DC Public Radio, Metro Transit
Announcements Promote EWeek Discover Engineering Family Day

IEEE-USA is sponsoring announcements on Washington, DC’s all-classical public radio station and in the capital city’s Metro transit system that promote  Discover Engineering Family Day, to be held at the National Building Museum in Washington on Saturday, 21 February.  

Discover Engineering Family Day, part of Engineers Week 2009, provides an interactive day-long program to introduce youngsters and their families to the excitement of engineering. The program engages more than 6,000 participants annually in “hands-on” and “minds-on” experiences to create an interest in engineering principles that are encountered in everyday life. The 2009 event encourages attendees to “work with engineers to invent something new.”

IEEE-USA and the National Engineers Week Foundation are major sponsors of EWeek Family Day. More information is available at http://www.eweek.org/EngineersWeek/FamilyDay.aspx

IEEE-USA has contracted with Metro transit to place posters promoting Family Day in 100 rail cars on all five Metro rail lines, plus installation of two lighted dioramas at the Judiciary Square/Building Museum Metro station. The Metro placements have been timed to coincide with record breaking use of the transportation system by hundreds of thousands of riders expected during the Presidential inauguration in Washington on 20 January.

Additionally, IEEE-USA is running promotional announcements highlighting Family Day in January and February on WETA-FM — broadcast during NPR and PBS news programs at http://www.weta.org/fm, and posted online in a community calendar at http://www.weta.org/local/calendar

Through its support of Family Day and other public awareness activities, IEEE-USA seeks to counter a public perception, cited in the last Harris interactive opinion poll on engineers and scientists, that engineers show less interest in their local communities than scientists. For more information on IEEE-USA’s public awareness program, go to http://www.ieeeusa.org/communications/default.asp

January 29th, 2009

PROCTER AND GAMBLE IN WORLD WAR II AND THE KOREAN WAR

How a Soap Company Revolutionized the Shell Loading Industry

Retired Engineers and Scientists of Cincinnati will offer CPD credit to Ohio P.E.’s and a rare opportunity for WWII history buff’s with this February 17 Program.

Homer Buescher, ChE, US Navy in WWII, P.&G. Retiree, & RESC member reveals to the public this historic P.&G. story. Homer speaks on how P. & G.  got involved in the shell loading business in 1940. He will describe how the U.S. secretly agreed to produce ammunition for Great Britain before Pearl Harbor. The information is no longer secret, but because it involved the British government before the U.S.  entered the war, it was top secret then.  Homer will reveal the major changes pioneered by P.&G. that revolutionized the industry and tremendously increased production and safety.  To his knowledge, this is the first time this information has been put together and released to the public.                          

 Homer  was born in Saint Louis and served in the U.S. Navy in WWII, becoming a pilot, then a deck officer on destroyer escorts, and trained in submarines. He majored in Chemical and Industrial Engineering, in college.  After graduation, he joined P.& G. in Baltimore, MD. He was transferred to the Army shell loading plant in Milan, TN when the Korean War broke out. He retired as the Company’s Human Factors Engineering Consultant.

When: February 17, 2009, 11:30 am Registration and Lunch; Program in the Auditorium 1:00 pm

Where: Evergreen, 230 West Galbraith Rd. (Hartwell), Cincinnati                                                             Lunch & CPD Certificate: $13.00 (Provide P.E. Reg number)
Reservations: to Zan Smith, RESC Treasurer, (513) 520-4338, by February 12
Visit www.resc.org for the mail-in form and February Newsletter about January 30.

January 28th, 2009

January 2009 – Section Meeting Information

JANUARY MEETING
The Science of Global Warming

DATE: Thursday, January 22, 2009
PLACE : Raffel’s – 10160 Reading Road (see below for directions)
TIME : 5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. –  Social Time
            6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. –  Dinner
            7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. –  Presentation
 
COST FOR DINNER: $10.00 per person – REGARDLESS OF MEMBERSHIP OR MEMBERSHIP GRADE!

NOTE:  DINNERS ARE ALWAYS OPTIONAL – YOU MAY ATTEND THE PROGRAM ONLY. 

MENU SELECTIONS:   Egg Plant Parmesan, Salisbury Steak, Baked Ham with Pineapples, Scalloped Potatoes, Seasoned Green Beans, Tossed Salad, Rolls and Butter, Assorted Pies, Coffee, Tea, Iced Tea, Soft Drinks. There is also a bar available for the purchase of alcoholic drinks.

LOCATION:  Raffel’s is located at 10160 Reading Road, south of Glendale-Milford Road on the east side of Reading. Take I-75 to the Glendale-Milford Rd. Exit, go east on Glendale-Milford Road approximately ¾ of a mile to Reading Rd. and turn right on Reading.

RESERVATIONS:  Please email Fred Nadeau for reservations at mailto:fnadeau1@earthlink.net (preferred) or call the Section Voice Mail at 513-629-9380 by Noon, Tuesday, January 20, 2009 if you plan to attend. Please leave your Name, IEEE Member Number, and a daytime telephone number.

PE CREDITS: Depending on the subject matter, attendance at IEEE Cincinnati Section Meetings now qualifies the attendee for Professional Development Hours towards renewal of Professional Engineers Licenses. Required documentation will be available following the meeting!  The Section Meetings also provide a great opportunity to network with fellow engineers in the area.

ABOUT THE MEETING:  Our speaker this month, Dr. Marwan Nusair, will give a fact based, analytical presentation on the hard science of global warming. He will discuss, based on scientific data, why some scientists think the earth is warming and why other scientists think the earth is actually cooling. Dr. Nusair is a member of the Cincinnati IEEE section and has a keen interest in the way climatology data has been presented to make the case for global warming.

January 14th, 2009

January 2009 – Membership News

NEW MEMBERS
The following individuals are IEEE members who are new to our Section:

Daniel Abbott
Patrick Annan
Jarret Callahan
James Anthony Charles
Jonathan Ford
John Gideon
Retina M. Hobbs
Nicholas Hunter
Johnny Maynard
Will Middleton
Michael James Pierce
Kirthi Radhakrishnan
Joshua Shank
Kyle A. Siefring
Daniel Ryan Talpas
Makio Tamura
Nishanth Vepachedu
Timmy R. Williams
Thomas Zajdel

We wish to welcome these new members to the Cincinnati Section!!!

January 14th, 2009

January 2009 – History

Scanning the Past: A History of Electrical Engineering from the Past

Submitted by Bob Morrison, Editor

Copyright 1995 IEEE. Reprinted with permission from the IEEE publication, “Scanning the Past” which covers a reprint of an article appearing in the Proceedings of the IEEE Vol. 83, No. 9, September 1995.

Irving Langmuir and the Thermionic Vacuum Tube

Eighty years ago this month, the PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS (IRE) included a paper by Irving Langmuir on the theory of the thermionic vacuum tube and some of its radio applications. The author, a future IRE president and Nobel Prize recipient, was at the General Electric Research Laboratory (GERL) when his paper was published.

Langmuir was born in 1881 in Brooklyn, NY, and graduated in metallurgical engineering from the Columbia School of Mines in 1903. He went to Germany for graduate work where he earned a Ph.D. in physical chemistry at the University of Gottingen in 1906. He returned to the United States, where he taught for three years at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, NJ, and where a heavy teaching load left him with little time for research. In 1909, he joined the research staff at the GERL where he spent the rest of his professional career.

Langmuir’s initial research at GERL concerned phenomena in electric lamps with tungsten filaments. Beginning in 1913, he investigated thermionic vacuum tubes and made important contributions to both theory and practice including improved vacuum pumps and pressure gauges. He found that even small traces of gases in a thermionic tube produced enormous changes in its performance. In his September 1915 paper, Langmuir explained the effect of space charge in the vicinity of the cathode and included theoretical equations for the current between electrodes as a function of tube geometry and applied voltage. He pointed out that “with the elimination of the gas effects, all the irregularities which had previously been thought inherent in vacuum discharges from hot cathodes were found to disappear.” He proposed the use of the term “kenotron” for two-element tubes that did not depend on gas for their operation and the term “pliotron” for vacuum triodes.

As examples of pliotron applications, Langmuir reported that small pliotrons were especially suitable for radio receivers where a cascade arrangement of tuned amplifiers had provided “a wonderfully high degree of selectivity.” He stated that a larger version of the pliotron could produce up to a kilowatt of power as an oscillator and that a 500-W radio telephone transmitter using pliotrons had been tested recently. Pliotrons were produced in large numbers by GE for military use during World War I and the availability of a 20-kW pliotron tube with water cooling was announced in 1922. Subsequently, GE produced pliotrons rated at 100 kW which were about 5 ft long and 6 in. in diameter.

Langmuir served as president of the IRE during 1923. During the 1920’s he investigated plasma physics and developed an ion sheath theory which proved important in the design of thyratrons and other gaseous electronic tubes. He also contributed to the theory of design of miniature vacuum tubes suitable for use at ultra-high frequencies. Langmuir received the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1932 in recognition of his work on surface chemistry and surface films. An interest in weather phenomena led him to work on methods of producing smoke screens and deicing aircraft wings during World War II. After the War he engaged in somewhat controversial experiments of cloud seeding as part of an effort to modify hurricanes or to induce rain at periodic intervals over large areas. He enjoyed outdoor activities including mountain climbing, skiing, and skate sailing. Langmuir retired from GE in 1950, but he continued as a consultant until his death in 1957. Twelve volumes of his collected papers were published from 1960 to 1962.

James E. Brittain
School of History , Technology and Society
Georgia Institute of Technology

January 14th, 2009

January 2009 – IEEE NEWS

Winning Entry in ‘How Engineers Make a World of Difference’ Online
Video Scholarship Competition Featured on ‘Design Squad’ Web Site

WASHINGTON (18 November 2008) — The winning entry in the 2008 IEEE-USA “How Engineers Make a World of Difference” Online Engineering Video Scholarship Competition can be seen on the PBS “Design Squad” Web site at http://pbskids.org/designsquad/special/ieee/ieee.html.  

Engineering Undergraduates Ben Toler and Emile Frey of Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, La., split the IEEE-USA competition’s $2,500 first prize. Their entry was deemed most effective in reinforcing for an 11-to-13-year-old audience how engineers improve the quality of life and how engineering can be a creative and rewarding career.  

With two teams of high-school students competing to solve a new engineering challenge each week, “Design Squad” was created by PBS to reach the same 11-to-13-year-old audience. The program is in its third season on PBS with the IEEE continuing funding support.

Additionally, IEEE-USA is awarding $5,000 in scholarship prizes in the second year of its online engineering video competition. Entries must be submitted through YouTube by U.S. undergraduate students in engineering, computer science and information technology no later than 16 January 2009. For more information on how to enter, go to http://www.ieeeusa.org/communications/video_competition.

IEEE-USA Participates in Technology-Enhancement Meeting with Obama Transition Team

WASHINGTON (11 December 2008) — The United States should deploy universal broadband and increase energy efficiency, among other things, to promote economic growth and spur job creation, two IEEE-USA presidents said in a letter presented to President-Elect Barack Obama’s transition team.

IEEE-USA made some of its recommendations in a meeting with four members of Obama’s Science, Technology and Innovation Transition Task Force at AeA’s Washington headquarters on 5 December. IEEE-USA was one of roughly 50 organizations invited to share ideas on what the new administration could do to stimulate the economy within Obama’s first 60 days in office.

“Technology and innovation remain the cornerstone of our nation’s economy,” 2008 IEEE-USA President Russ Lefevre and 2009 President Gordon Day wrote. “Any plan for creating jobs and economic growth begins with encouraging innovation that promotes those new ideas and products and, ultimately, results in jobs.”
 
IEEE-USA made recommendations in six areas: research & development investments, broadband, health care, energy infrastructure, small business and long-term priorities.

By expanding ubiquitous broadband access into rural areas, more people could compete for technology-based jobs without relocating. Plus, the incentive for high-tech companies to establish operations in these lower-cost areas is enhanced. This helps keep jobs in the United States.

“As with the universal deployment of electricity and telephone service, universal broadband service, coupled with new Internet applications, will generate economic and social gains that far exceed the investment in the enabling infrastructure,” the presidents wrote.

IEEE-USA believes that by investing in such things as Smart Grid technologies, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and clean, renewable energy sources, U.S. energy efficiency will increase.

“We also need to increase our electricity reliability by upgrading our aging national transmission grid,” presidents Lefevre and Day wrote. “These steps can stimulate economic activity, create jobs and ensure that our country has abundant supplies of reliable and affordable electric power.”

The letter is available at http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/policy/2008/120508.pdf

January 14th, 2009

From Charlie’s Desk

Mary FruehwaldWine Selection 

  • I hope everyone had a good holiday season and that your new year started out well. Thank you for electing me as your chairperson for 2009/2010. We are currently planning the meetings and events for the year, and if you have any comments about the content, format, or anything else you like or don’t like about them please let me know. Send me an email at cnash@ieee.org.  
  • Our December meeting was a big success. Mary Fruehwald from The Wine Store, in Montgomery, served us a generous selection of holiday wines. Sparkling wines, tables wines, dessert wines, and gift wines were served in a casual interactive setting. Everyone had a great time.  
  • At this month’s meeting on January 22nd, section member Dr. Marwan Nusair will be presenting data and research that refutes the arguments given in recent global climate change arguments. Marwan is a dynamic speaker and gives a compelling engineering point of view on man-caused climate change. Check the January announcement on the website for complete details on the meeting. 
  • In this recession we are struggling through, I personally know several people who are now looking for jobs. I hope you are fairing well. If you are looking for work, take a look at our website’s listing of Cincinnati area companies. The link is “Cincinnati Companies” in the “About Us” sidebar section. There are numerous links to companies’ websites. Also, our monthly meetings are a great place to network with other engineers and find out about local companies.Take care and I’ll see you on the 22nd. Come up and say “hi”.

January 11th, 2009


Calendar

January 2009
S M T W T F S
« Dec   Feb »
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Posts by Month

Posts by Category