Archive for October, 2011

IEEE-Dayton Section Fall Member Conference

 Wednesday, November 16, 2011

 Global Climate Change

 The Fraudulent Claims & the Science

For more information:  http://ewh.ieee.org/r2/dayton/

Add comment October 24th, 2011

Make Plans for our December Meeting

This year for our December 1st meeting we decided to try something different. We would like everyone to bring your favorite tool or toy to share with everyone. Bring that new 3D smartphone, 3DSi,  the old Radio Shack TRS-80 computer in your basement, that new handheld digital oscilloscope, the electric car you’ve been working on, that K&E mahogany slide rule you had in college, or any intriguing bit of technology to share with us. We will arrange tables around the meeting room for you to set up on and if you want to give a short presentation we’ll have the video projector ready. Of course Raffels will lay out a great holiday spread so it will be a great evening. Please let me know what your thinking about bringing and I’ll update this posting with all the stuff.

So far the following items will be at the meeting:

  • Handheld digital oscilloscope
  • Altair 8800 – 1975 personal computer
  • A 1920s and 1960s slide rules and geometry kits
  • Examples of some die cast British-made model trains
  • A very rare toy hovercraft from 1964, made in England by the same company that made Dinky Toys and other things
  • A 1950s windup “perpetual motion” ride (the windup motor betrays it) made by Wolverine
  • 1922 RCA Radiola Senior Regenerative Receiver

If you have a gizmo that the members would like to see send me a email and let me know what your bringing.

Charlie Nash

cnash@ieee.org

Add comment October 18th, 2011

Nominating Committee Announces Slate

The Nominating Committee for the Cincinnati Section is pleased to announce its slate for our November election:

Member-At-Large

  • Ted Longshore
  • Jay Perin

The Section is also accepting Petition Candidates until November 4, 2011.  A petition candidate must have the signatures of at least nine (9) voting members of the Cincinnati Section. The election will occur in November.  More information about the candidates will be available prior to the election. 


Add comment October 18th, 2011

ASME Cincinnati Section October Envision Center by Duke Energy Tour

 Tour of Duke Energy Envision Center

Where: 4580 Olympic Blvd, Erlanger, KY 41018

 When:  Wednesday, October 19, 2011  3:00 P.M. Tour Begins 

5:00 P.M. Tour Finishes 5:30 P.M. Dinner at a Local Restaurant (self funded)

 Cost: Free   (Tour limited to 20)

  for ASME members, non-members, and all guests; Free for student members.

Located in Erlanger, Kentucky, Duke Energy’s Envision Center provides visitors a dynamic experience that demonstrates the possibilities of modernizing to smart grid and energy efficient technology.

 The center features a movie-style studio with sets consisting of a substation with two-way digital technology, a smart home – complete with solar panels and a plug-in hybrid vehicle, an apartment complex with smart meters and a power delivery work center – monitoring conditions with real-time data. Electric poles equipped with intelligent power equipment are also staged throughout.

 Center visitors can watch video presentations that showcase a day in the life of a variety of energy customers in the year 2015. Visitors will also experience simulated demonstrations such as a thunderstorm, lightning strike and power outage. Home simulations feature the use of an energy-management system to control high efficiency appliances (e.g., dishwasher, water heater, HVAC equipment).

 Smart grid technology will enable:

 • Improved system reliability and operational efficiency

 • Quicker and more accurate response to outages

 • Greater customer offerings (e.g., energy efficiency programs and payment options)

 • New tools and programs that enable customers to predict and gain control of energy usage.

 The center also promotes the importance of renewable power to meet the energy needs of tomorrow and how customers can play an important role in helping us reduce our carbon footprint.

 See Directions on Next Page

 ASME Section News 3

 Directions to Envision Center SM by Duke Energy Tour

 From 75N

 Take I-75/I-71 North towards the CVG airport (I-275 W)

 Take the Mineola Pike Exit (first exit off of I-275)

 Go LEFT on Mineola Pike

 At the second stop light, GO LEFT onto Olympic Blvd.

 Travel down Olympic Blvd past companies like Toyota and Pepsi

 The Envision Center is located in the last building on the left – Building C – before you intersect Turfway Road

 GO RIGHT into the parking lot in front of Building C. The Envision Center is at the end

 From Cincinnati, OH:

 Take I-75/I-71 South into Kentucky to I-275 West (towards the airport)

 Take Mineola Pike Exit (first exit off of I-275)

 GO LEFT on Mineola Pike

 At the second stop light, GO LEFT onto Olympic Blvd.

 Travel down Olympic Blvd past companies like Toyota and Pepsi

 The Envision Center is located in the last building on the left – Building C – before you intersect Turfway Road

 GO RIGHT into the parking lot in front of Building C. The Envision Center is at the end

 From Columbus, OH:

 Take I-71 South toward Cincinnati, OH

 Merge onto I-71 South via Exit 99A on the LEFT toward Cincinnati (crossing into Kentucky)

 Take I-75/I-71 South into Kentucky to I-275 West (towards the airport)

 Take Mineola Pike Exit (first exit off of I-275)

 GO LEFT on Mineola Pike

 At the second stop light, GO LEFT onto Olympic Blvd.

 Travel down Olympic Blvd past companies like Toyota and Pepsi

 The Envision Center is located in the last building on the left – Building C – before you intersect Turfway Road

 GO RIGHT into the parking lot in front of Building C. The Envision Center is at the end

 From Greater Cincinnati / Northern KY Airport (code CVG):

 Take I-275 East

 Take Mineola Pike Exit

 RIGHT on Mineola Pike

 LEFT onto Olympic Blvd.

 Travel down Olympic Blvd past companies like Toyota and Pepsi

 The Envision Center is located in the last building on the left – Building C – before you intersect Turfway Road

 GO RIGHT into the parking lot in front of Building C. The Envision Center is at the end

 

Add comment October 14th, 2011

OCTOBER 2011 SECTION MEETING INFORMATION

Electronic Paper (e-Paper), a review of the state of the art and highlight of activities at the University of Cincinnati

 UPDATED 10/11/2011

DATE:

Thursday, October 27, 2011

PLACE :

University of Cincinnati (see below for directions)

TIME :

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. –  Dinner & Social

 

7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. –  Presentation

COST

Free

 

 

 MENU SELECTIONS:   Pizza from Adriatico’s , Soda and water will be available during the meeting.

LOCATION:  University of Cincinnati Main Campus, 427 Engineering Research Center (ERC)

 Park in the Campus Green parking garage located on Woodside Pl. on campus.  All attendees from the Cincinnati Section will have parking fees waived for the garage.  The ERC building is then located on the same street going south and to the west.   Google Maps link from the parking garage to the ERC. http://g.co/maps/re3s4

 The conference room, 427 ERC, is located up the stairs after entering the building. The corridor is to the right on the 400 level.  There are signs posted for the conference room.  Signs will also be posted in the area to point attendees specifically toward the IEEE event.

 RESERVATIONS:  (Please note New Procedure) Please make reservations for each meeting by going to: http://www.ieeecincinnati.org/meetings/.  Please click on the appropriate link and complete the reservation. 

Reservations close at noon on October 25th, 2011 and is limited to 70 people.

DINNER RESERVATION CANCELLATION POLICY
An email to Reservations@ieeecincinnati.org prior to the close of reservations is required to properly cancel your reservation.

All Reservations must be made by noon, Tuesday October 25th, 2011

 PE CREDITS:  Depending on the subject matter, attendance at IEEE Cincinnati Section Meetings now qualifies the attendee for Professional Development Hours towards renewal of Professional Engineers Licenses. Required documentation will be available following the meeting!  The Section Meetings also provide a great opportunity to network with fellow engineers in the area.

  ABOUT THE MEETING:   

Dr Heikenfeld will be presenting details of his research at UC of e-paper technologies, the technology behind his specific method of e-paper as well as its advantages over other existing technologies.

Additionally:  there should be plans, diagrams, and concept drawings available of the future EE/CompE area presently under renovation.  Student IEEE members will be on hand to assist and answer questions.

Tours will also be available of the site (under construction) for the $3M Ohio Center for MicroFluidic Innovation.

 ABOUT THE PRESENTER:  

Jason Heikenfeld received the B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Cincinnati in 1998 and 2001, respectively. During 2001-2005 Dr. Heikenfeld co-founded and served as principal scientist at Extreme Photonix Corp. In 2005 he returned to the University of Cincinnati as a Professor in the Dept. of Electrical & Computer Engineering. Dr. Heikenfeld’s university laboratory, The Novel Devices Laboratory www.ece.uc.edu/devices, is currently engaged in electrofluidic device research for beam steering, displays, and electronic paper. He has greater than 100 publications, has presented numerous invited talks, and his inventions have resulted in over a dozen pending or granted patents. Dr. Heikenfeld is a Senior member of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a Senior member of the Society for Information Display, and a member of SPIE, MRS.

Add comment October 8th, 2011

MEMBERSHIP NEWS

If you are interested in upgrading your membership to Senior Member, please contact any member of the Executive Committee.

NEW MEMBERS

The following individuals are IEEE members who are new to our Section: 

 

Daniel Arntsen

David Butler

Francesca Cecioni

Ryan Child

Zhen Hu

Jonathan Kopecheck

Seth Kravetz

Jonathan Maglaty

Kyle McAllister

Tomislav Novakovic

Quintin Oliver

David Pyrak

Charles Smith

Chad Sobota

Eric Statzer

Douglas Tittle

George Topala

Jason Varbedian

 

 

 

We wish to welcome these members to the Cincinnati Section!!!

Add comment October 8th, 2011

History of Electrical Engineering

Scanning the Past: A History of Electrical Engineering from the Past

Submitted by Marc Bell, Editor

Copyright 1997 IEEE. Reprinted with permission from the IEEE publication, “Scanning the Past” which covers a reprint of an article appearing in the Proceedings of the IEEE Vol. 85, No. 6, June 1997.

 Edwin H. Colpitts, a communications engineer and re­search manager, was born 125 years ago this year. Remem­bered especially as the inventor of the Colpitts oscillator, he made significant contributions to both wire and radio telephony.

  Born in 1872 in New Brunswick, Canada, Colpitts grad­uated from Mount Allison College in 1893. After two years as a teacher and school principal in Newfoundland, he enrolled at Harvard University, where he studied physics and mathematics and received a Master’s degree in 1897. He remained at Harvard for two additional years while taking advanced courses and serving as a laboratory assis­tant to John Trowbridge, director of the Jefferson Physical Laboratory.

  Early in 1899, Colpitts joined the engineering staff of the American Bell Telephone Company in Boston, MA, where he began as an assistant to George A. Campbell, known for his work on loading coils and electric wave filters. Colpitts designed a variable-frequency generator for use in research on telephonic transmission and also carried out an investigation of dielectrics for capacitors. He did both theoretical and experimental work related to the proper loading of telephone circuits to minimize distortion and attenuation. Subsequently, he undertook a comprehensive series of tests intended to reduce crosstalk by the transposition of wires in contiguous circuits.

  In 1907, Colpitts was transferred to the Western Electric Company in New York City, and in 1911, he was selected to head a research group. He and his colleagues began work on applications of the vacuum tube, including a push-pull amplifier and a modulator circuit, which he designed. The Colpitts modulator enabled signals sent by wire to control a radio transmitter at a remote location. Early in 1915, Colpitts proposed an oscillator circuit using capacitive coupling (Fig. 1) as an alternative to the inductive coupling used by the oscillator invented by a colleague, Ralph Hartley. The Bell engineers demonstrated transatlantic radio telephony using a vacuum-tube transmitter during 1915.

     Colpitts served in the Signal Corps of the U.S. Army during World War I and spent some time in France as a staff officer concerned with military communication (Fig. 2). He authored a joint paper with Edward B. Craft on radio telephony published in the Transactions of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE) in 1919. The pa­per reviewed developments over the previous five years, including military radio equipment introduced during the war (Figs. 3, 4, and 5). Colpitts and Craft wrote that “the possibility of communication by speech between any two individuals in the civilized world is one of the most desirable ends for which engineering can strive.” They compared wire and radio telephony and included some advantages and limitations of each system (Fig. 6).

  Colpitts and Otto B. Blackwell published an important paper on carrier multiplex telephony and telegraphy in the Transactions of the AIEE in 1921. They summarized work on bandpass filters and vacuum-tube electronics, which had enabled a four-channel commercial system to be placed in operation between Baltimore, MD, and Pittsburgh, PA, in 1918. They stated that the carrier method of multiplexing was “technically one of the most interesting and important of the developments which have been perfected in the art of electrical communications during the past few years.” They observed that Campbell’s band filters had been of “vital importance in the success of carrier telephone systems,” while the thermionic vacuum tube had provided a way to overcome many barriers to commercial systems. They concluded that the technique used was “fascinating” but “to. the engineer, the economics of the situation are all important, for it avails nothing if it is not possible to accomplish by the new method the same or better results than were obtainable with the old at no greater cost.”

  Colpitts was a vice-president at the Bell Telephone Labo­ratories at the time of hisretirement in 1937, but came out of retirement to work on the National Defense Research Committee on problems related to antisubmarine warfare during World War II. He died in 1949 at age 77.

James E. Brit tain

Add comment October 8th, 2011

IEEE National News

Stories in this Edition:

  • Small Business Innovation Research, Technology Infrastructure Can Help Create Jobs
  • Advice for Current & Potential Consultants Featured in Latest IEEE-USA E-book
  • IEEE/IEEE-USA Seek Nominations for 2012 New Faces of Engineering Recognition; College Edition Program Started
  • Paid Summer 2012 Internship At Mass Media News Outlet Available to U.S. IEEE Student Members
  • Median Income of Electrotechnology, IT Professionals Rises to $118,000; Communications Technology Workers Report Highest Income, IEEE-USA Salary Survey Reveals
  • ‘IEEE-USA in ACTION’ App Available in iTunes Store
  • IEEE-USA E-Book on Résumés First to be Offered Free as Special Benefit to IEEE Members

All Stories are available at the IEEE National section of our site:  http://www.ieeecincinnati.org/category/ieee-national/

Small Business Innovation Research, Technology Infrastructure Can Help Create Jobs

WASHINGTON (9 September 2011) — To help encourage job growth, Congress should reauthorize the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and invest in America’s technology infrastructure.

During his speech to Congress last night, President Barack Obama specifically cited small businesses as a key to job creation. “Everyone here knows that small businesses are where most new jobs begin,” Obama said. “And you know that while corporate profits have come roaring back, smaller companies haven’t.”  

One simple way that Congress can immediately help small technology companies is by passing a long-term SBIR reauthorization.

SBIR is a competitive, federally funded program that helps small companies conduct research into new technology. But because Congress has failed to pass a long-term SBIR reauthorization, companies cannot be sure of the program’s reliability.

“High-tech entrepreneurs are job creators, and our country should do everything we can to support them,” IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen said. “Congress’ failure to reauthorize the program for more than a year at a time has created uncertainty among small technology companies, and uncertainty breeds hesitation, which breeds stagnation. Congress could end this uncertainty by passing a long-term reauthorization of the program.”

Obama also highlighted the important role that infrastructure investments play in the economic health of our country. But Congress should recognize that infrastructure in the 21st century must include a robust and intelligent electrical grid. The recent blackout in parts of Southern California, Arizona and Mexico demonstrates that our grid needs to be strengthened. Emerging technologies offer innovative ways to increase the reliability and efficiency of the system.  

“A reliable, efficient and affordable electric grid and IT infrastructure can power job growth across our country,” Jensen said. “Investing in our nation’s electrical infrastructure not only creates jobs today but also lays the foundation for a strong economy tomorrow.”

Small Business Innovation Research, Technology Infrastructure Can Help Create Jobs

WASHINGTON (9 September 2011) — To help encourage job growth, Congress should reauthorize the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and invest in America’s technology infrastructure.

During his speech to Congress last night, President Barack Obama specifically cited small businesses as a key to job creation. “Everyone here knows that small businesses are where most new jobs begin,” Obama said. “And you know that while corporate profits have come roaring back, smaller companies haven’t.”  

One simple way that Congress can immediately help small technology companies is by passing a long-term SBIR reauthorization.

SBIR is a competitive, federally funded program that helps small companies conduct research into new technology. But because Congress has failed to pass a long-term SBIR reauthorization, companies cannot be sure of the program’s reliability.

“High-tech entrepreneurs are job creators, and our country should do everything we can to support them,” IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen said. “Congress’ failure to reauthorize the program for more than a year at a time has created uncertainty among small technology companies, and uncertainty breeds hesitation, which breeds stagnation. Congress could end this uncertainty by passing a long-term reauthorization of the program.”

Obama also highlighted the important role that infrastructure investments play in the economic health of our country. But Congress should recognize that infrastructure in the 21st century must include a robust and intelligent electrical grid. The recent blackout in parts of Southern California, Arizona and Mexico demonstrates that our grid needs to be strengthened. Emerging technologies offer innovative ways to increase the reliability and efficiency of the system.  

“A reliable, efficient and affordable electric grid and IT infrastructure can power job growth across our country,” Jensen said. “Investing in our nation’s electrical infrastructure not only creates jobs today but also lays the foundation for a strong economy tomorrow.”

Advice for Current & Potential Consultants Featured in Latest IEEE-USA E-book

WASHINGTON (13 September 2011) — Many engineers, for various reasons, are thinking about becoming independent consultants. But the skills required to go out on your own are not taught in engineering schools, writes William Kassebaum, P.E., in the introduction to “The Best of IEEE-USA Today’s Engineer: On Consulting — Volume 2.”

“Many engineers are apprehensive about making the transition from a salaried position with predictable weekly or monthly earnings, to a situation where the perception is that income would be uncertain and irregular,” said Kassebaum, chair of the IEEE Alliance of Consultants Networks Coordinating Committee. “Almost all experienced consultants were once company employees. They made the change, and most of them will say it was the wisest career and business decision they ever made.”

This second volume of articles, which originally ran in “IEEE-USA Today’s Engineer,” is an IEEE-USA e-book compilation of nine consulting-related stories. A sampling includes, “Consulting: The Dawn of a New Era;” “Moonlighting Engineers: The Consultant Stands Alone;” “Is It Your Time To Be An Entrepreneur;” and “Using Social Media to Attract New Business.”

The publication also features the “2010 Profile of IEEE Consultants,” which is based on the “2010 IEEE-USA Salary and Fringe Benefits Survey.” The profile provides information on things like average number of hours consultants worked per week (27.1) and median billing rate ($120).

You can purchase your copy of “The Best of IEEE-USA Today’s Engineer: On Consulting — Volume 2” at www.ieeeusa.org/communications/ebooks for the IEEE member price: $4.79. Nonmember price is $5.99.

IEEE members can purchase other IEEE-USA E-Books at deeply discounted member prices — and download some free e-books at www.ieeeusa.org/communications/ebooks.

IEEE/IEEE-USA Seek Nominations for 2012 New Faces of Engineering Recognition; College Edition Program Started

WASHINGTON (16 September 2011) — Nominations are now open for IEEE members under 30 to be recognized as the IEEE/IEEE-USA’s 2012 “New Face of Engineering.” In addition, a “College Edition” program for IEEE student members has started.

The Engineers Week (EWeek) “New Faces of Engineering” program recognizes engineers new to the profession with outstanding educational and career accomplishments. The program is open to IEEE members worldwide.

To be eligible for recognition, engineers must be 30 or younger as of 31 December 2011, and have a degree in engineering or computer engineering from a recognized U.S. college or equivalent international educational institution.

Judges will evaluate nominees based on their educational attainment, engineering achievements and participation and accomplishments in professional and technical society activities. Particular consideration is given to work (e.g. volunteering, publishing, conference presentations) in IEEE technical societies.
       
IEEE nominations should be directed to Sharon Richardson at s.richardson@ieee.org. Self-nominations are not permitted. The nomination form and more information are available at http://www.ieeeusa.org/communications/eweek/newfaces/default.asp.  

The nomination deadline is 21 October 2011.

The IEEE/IEEE-USA top choice will be featured during EWeek (19-25 February 2012) in a full-page ad in USA Today: http://www.eweek.org/Site/pdfs/USA_Today_Ad.pdf. Up to four others will be recognized on the EWeek Web site (www.eweek.org). Sampathkumar Veeraraghavan, IEEE’s 2011 New Face, was honored for his humanitarian work with women and children in India: http://www.ieeeusa.org/communications/releases/2011/030111.asp.

“College Edition” Program

The “New Faces of Engineering: College Edition” is for third-, fourth- and fifth-year IEEE student members enrolled in a bachelor of science engineering program at an ABET-accredited college or equivalent international institution, and have a minimum grade-point average of 3.0. The initiative is designed to recognize students whose academic success, contributions and experiences in engineering have them poised for future success.

The application is available on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CollegeEdition. Winners will be featured on the page, and their hometown and college newspapers will be notified. The nomination deadline is also 21 October 2011.

Sponsored by more than 100 engineering, science and education societies, as well as major corporations dedicated to increasing public awareness and appreciation of engineering, EWeek is celebrated annually by thousands of engineers, engineering students, teachers and leaders in government and business. IEEE served as lead society during EWeek 1993 and 2004, and will serve again in 2014.

Battelle and ASME are EWeek 2012 co-chairs.

 

Paid Summer 2012 Internship At Mass Media News Outlet Available to U.S. IEEE Student Members; Helping Journalists Communicate Authoritatively to the Public on Science, Engineering and Technology

WASHINGTON (24 September 2011) — A paid summer 2012 internship at a mass media news outlet is available to a U.S. IEEE student member who can help journalists in print or broadcast fields communicate authoritatively to the public about science, engineering and technology.  

IEEE-USA is seeking applications from U.S. IEEE undergraduate and graduate student members to work full-time June-August 2012 as a reporter, researcher or production assistant in a mass media organization — including radio and TV stations, newspapers and magazines — both print and electronic. Applications are due by 15 January 2012.

In addition to receiving a weekly stipend and travel expenses, IEEE-USA Engineering Mass Media Fellows gain valuable work experience and sharpen their communication skills as they report on today’s sci-tech news for the general public. IEEE-USA Engineering Mass Media Fellows have been assigned to such media outlets as The Los Angeles Times, the Voice of America, Scientific American and WNBC-TV.

2011 IEEE-USA Engineering Mass Media Fellow Brandon Blakeley interned for 10 weeks this past summer at The Oregonian in Portland, Ore. His first story appeared on the front page of the newspaper’s Living Section and described how Twitter “has become a trove of human language and interactions unmatched in size, detail and availability.” Go to:

www.oregonlive.com/living/index.ssf/2011/06/tweet_talk_from_the_associatio.html

Blakeley considered his “best story” a look at “why spiders don’t get stuck to their webs,” which appeared on the front page of a Saturday Oregonian. See:

www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2011/07/inquiring_minds_want_to_know_w.html

Since 2000, 14 U.S. IEEE undergraduate and graduate students have served as IEEE-USA Engineering Mass Media Fellows. IEEE-USA is the only engineering organization in the Mass Media Fellows program administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

The AAAS program, begun in 1974, has placed some 600 fellows who have filed hundreds of stories in print and electronic media. To download a AAAS application, go to:

www.aaas.org/programs/education/MassMedia/apply.shtml

For more information on IEEE-USA participation in the AAAS program, and to print out a flyer on the activity, see:

www.ieeeusa.org/communications/massmedia.asp

 

Median Income of Electrotechnology, IT Professionals Rises to $118,000; Communications Technology Workers Report Highest Income, IEEE-USA Salary Survey Reveals

WASHINGTON (26 September 2011) — Median 2010 income for electrotechnology and information technology professionals rose nearly four percent from the previous year, according to the latest IEEE-USA Salary & Fringe Benefit Survey.

Median incomes from primary sources — salary, commissions, bonuses and net self-employment income — for U.S. IEEE members working full-time in their primary area of technical competence (job specialty) moved from $113,500 in the 2009 tax year to $118,000 in 2010, a 3.96 percent increase.

Of the record 17,030 U.S. IEEE members who responded to the Internet-based survey, 12,877 were employed full-time in their job specialty. Those working in communications technology reported the highest median income ($135,000), while workers in circuits and devices were second ($125,252). Those in signals and applications and engineering and human environment tied for third ($125,000).

On the other end of the spectrum, energy and power engineering professionals reported a median of $107,000, followed by industrial applications ($109,350) and systems and control ($110,000).

The IEEE-USA Salary & Fringe Benefit Survey, 2011 Edition, is the 24th compensation survey the organization has conducted since 1972. It also includes income data based on things like age, ethnicity, gender, experience and years with current employer. The results are valuable to companies seeking to know what type of compensation package they should put together to attract and retain electrotechnology and IT professionals, and to employees looking to benchmark their salary and benefits.

The IEEE-USA Salary Service offers annual subscribers access to an online salary calculator and survey reports (2009-11) for accurately benchmarking technical professionals’ compensation individually or organization-wide. The service combines the power of online relational databases, sophisticated regression modeling and data extracted from the annual IEEE-USA Salary & Fringe Benefit Survey. For more information, see https://ieeeusa.gallup.com.

‘IEEE-USA in ACTION’ App Available in iTunes Store

WASHINGTON (28 September 2011) – An app for “IEEE-USA in ACTION,” IEEE-USA’s quarterly electronic publication, is now available for download from the iTunes store. The app is free and compatible with iPad, iPod touch and iPhone.

See http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ieee-usa-in-action/id461081367.

“IEEE-USA in ACTION” highlights IEEE-USA programs, products, services and activities. This interactive online magazine features stories for technology professionals, polls, photo slideshows, commenting and the ability to share articles through social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter. The full page of a story can also be viewed without having to scroll.

The app contains six past issues and the fall 2011 issue (http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/ieeeusa/ieeeusa_fall11/index.php?startid=2#/1). The latter features articles on, among other things, IEEE members’ attitudes toward workplaces and careers, an e-book series on “Leading and Managing,” diary of a congressional fellow, high-energy visits to Capitol Hill and IEEE-USA’s student video competition.

Once the app is downloaded, new issues of “IEEE-USA in ACTION” will automatically be added to your device four times a year.

IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE. http://www.ieeeusa.org

IEEE-USA E-Book on Résumés First to be Offered Free as Special Benefit to IEEE Members

WASHINGTON (29 September 2011) — As a special benefit of IEEE membership, IEEE-USA will be offering one free e-book each month to IEEE members.

The e-book offering for October is “Engineers’ Guide to Lifelong Employability: On Résumés.” This e-book provides everything you need to know about creating and using résumé and cover letters — traditional to digital — in a convenient, easy-to-read format. In it you’ll learn:

* The basics of résumé formats, content and delivery
* How to update your résumé
* How to avoid common résumé blunders

“Your résumé should describe your skills and accomplishments plainly enough so that employers can tell within about a minute whether you fit their immediate staffing needs or not,” former IEEE-USA Employment & Career Services Chair Jean Eason said.

From Oct. 1 through Oct. 31, “Engineers’ Guide to Lifelong Employability: On Résumés” can be downloaded at www.ieeeusa.org/communications/ebooks  for free to IEEE Members. The nonmember price is $5.99. Members can purchase other IEEE-USA E-Books at deeply discounted prices and download other free e-books.
 
In November the free publication will be book two in the “Engineers’ Guide to Lifelong Employability” series: “Transitioning from School to Work.” In December it will be book three, “What Are You Worth?”
 
To learn about the many benefits of IEEE membership, visit http://www.ieee.org/membership_services/membership/join/.

Add comment October 8th, 2011

UV Disinfection Treatment Facility at the Greater Cincinnati Water Works (RESC)

 RESC Program for October 18, 2011

by: Carel Vandermeyden P.E.

See web site for reservations

This presentation discusses the implementation of a new $30 million state-of-the-art Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection Treatment Facility that the Greater Cincinnati Water Works (GCWW) started constructing in November 2010. When operational, GCWW will be the largest water utility in North America to use UV treatment following sand filtration and Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) absorption.

The 19,600 square foot UV facility, being built at GCWW’s Richard Miller Treatment Plant, will further enhance water quality and protect against potential disease-causing protozoa such as cryptosporidium. The addition of UV disinfection will provide a state-of-the-art multi-barrier treatment process to enhance water quality and further protect the public’s health.

Add comment October 2nd, 2011


Calendar

October 2011
S M T W T F S
« Sep   Nov »
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category