Archive for November, 2011

DECEMBER MEETING

ANNUAL HOLIDAY MEETING- TOOLS & TOYS

DATE:

Thursday, DECEMBER 1, 2011

PLACE :

Raffel’s – 10160 Reading Road (see below for directions)

TIME :

5:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. –  Social Time

 

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. –  Dinner (Reservation Required)

 

7:00 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. –  Show and Tell

COST

$12- $20, See information in Reservations

 

This year for our December 1st meeting we decided to try something different. We would like everyone to bring your favorite tool or toy to share with everyone. Bring that new 3D smartphone, 3DSi, the old Radio Shack TRS-80 computer in your basement, that new handheld digital oscilloscope, the electric car you’ve been working on, that K&E mahogany slide rule you had in college or any intriguing bit of technology to share with us. We will arrange tables around the meeting room for you to set up on and if you want to give a short presentation we’ll have the video projector ready. Of course Raffels will lay out a great holiday spread so it will be a great evening.

Kindle Fire

Kindle Fire

Also, every person sitting for dinner will get a chance at the door prize,  a new Amazon Kindle Fire tablet e-reader, so get your dinner reservations in.

Please let us know what you’re thinking about bringing and we will update this posting with all the stuff. So far the following items will be at the meeting:

  • Handheld digital oscilloscope
  • Altair 8800 – 1975 personal computer
  • A 1920s and 1960s slide rules and geometry kits
  • Examples of some die cast British-made model trains
  • A very rare toy hovercraft from 1964, made in England by the same company that made Dinky Toys and other things
  • A 1950s windup “perpetual motion” ride (the windup motor betrays it) made by Wolverine
  • 1922 RCA Radiola Senior Regenerative Receiver
  • Cabinet making hand tools including hand planes and pictures of cabinet projects
  • Leeds & Northrup optical pyrometer
  • Honeywell-Rubicon Wheatstone bridge
  • GE panel AC ammeter
  • GE benchtop DC ammeter
  • Galvin potentiometer
  • Zeiss comparator
  • Small Robot
  • Home brew DVR

If you have a gizmo that the members would like to see, send Charlie Nash a email and let me know what you’re bringing.

 

 MENU SELECTIONS:

Buffet Menu: Roasted Turkey & Dressing, Baked Ham with Pineapples, Couscous Stuffed Green Peppers, Sweet Potato Casserole, Scalloped Potatoes, Seasoned Green Beans, Cranberry Relish, Dinner Rolls and Butter, and Dessert (Chef’s Choice)

LOCATION:  Raffel’s is located at 10160 Reading Road, south of Glendale-Milford Road on the east side of Reading. Take I-75 to the Glendale-Milford Rd. Exit, go east on Glendale-Milford Road approximately ¾ of a mile to Reading Rd. and turn right on Reading.

RESERVATIONS:  (Please note New Procedure) Please make reservations for each meeting by going to: http://www.ieeecincinnati.org/meetings/.  Please click on the appropriate link and complete the reservation.  You may now pay on-line. 

DINNER RESERVATIONS
Members: $12.00
Non-members: $15.00

Two ways to pay for dinner:
1) [Register and pay the fee now] using PayPal.
2) [Register and pay the fee at the meeting]. Check or cash; correct change appreciated.

Make checks payable to “IEEE Cincinnati Section”.
Those desiring to use their bank’s bill payer service to send a check, rather than paying at the meeting, should contact Reservations@ieeecincinnati.org for details.

Reservations close at noon on November 24th, 2011.

DINNER RESERVATION CANCELLATION POLICY
An email to Reservations@ieeecincinnati.org prior to the close of reservations is required to properly cancel your reservation. Failure to cancel does not eliminate your responsibility to pay for the dinner. Refunds for PayPal payments are more complicated, and we request that you leave the funds on deposit for a future meeting.

WALK-INS: Walk-ins are not available for this meeting.

All Reservations must be made by noon, Thursday, November 24th, 2011

 PE CREDITS:  Depending on the subject matter, attendance at IEEE Cincinnati Section Meetings now qualifies the attendee for Professional Development Hours towards renewal of Professional Engineers Licenses. Required documentation will be available following the meeting!  The Section Meetings also provide a great opportunity to network with fellow engineers in the area.

Add comment November 9th, 2011

MEMBERSHIP NEWS

If you are interested in upgrading your membership to Senior Member, please contact any member of the Executive Committee.

NEW MEMBERS

The following individuals are IEEE members who are new to our Section:

 

Blake Adkins

Daniel Arntsen

Art Bales

Nicholas Blanton

Nicholas Bosler

Jesse Bramble

Ryan Child

Suresh Damotharan

Joseph Eaton

Jennifer Elliott

Andrew Galish

Thomas Gorczynski

Venkatesh Gutta

Joshua Hill

Zhen Hu

Donald Johnson

Seth Kravetz

Jonathan Maglaty

Tyler Maschino

Kyle McAllister

Ben Michels

Uday Parshionikar

Ralf Philipp

Nancy Rivers

Forrest Simmons

Haibin Su

George Topala

Jason Varbedian

We wish to welcome these members to the Cincinnati Section!!!

Add comment November 9th, 2011

Scanning the Past: A History of Electrical Engineering from the Past

Frank J. Sprague and the Electrification of Urban Transportation

Submitted by Marc Bell, Editor

Copyright 1997 IEEE. Reprinted with permission from the IEEE publication, “Scanning the Past” which covers a reprint of an article appearing in the Proceedings of the IEEE Vol. 85, No. 7, July 1997.

Frank J. Sprague (Fig. 1), known for his pioneering contributions to electric traction, electric elevators, and other applications of electric motors, was born 140 years ago this month. In recognition of his achievements in the field of electric power, he received the Edison Medal of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers (AIEE) in 1910. He also served as president of the AIEE during 1892-1893.

The son of the plant superintendent of a hat factory, Sprague was born in Milford, CT, and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1878, the same year that the Edison Electric Light Company was incorporated. He served for about two years on a naval ship known as the Richmond and acted as a special correspondent of the Boston Herald while General Ulysses S. Grant spent time on the ship during visits to China and Japan. Subsequently, Sprague served aboard the Lancaster, stationed in the Mediterranean, and installed an electric call bell on the ship. He managed to observe an exhibition of electric lighting systems, including that of Edison, in Paris, France in 1881. 

In 1882, Ensign Sprague was granted leave to attend and report on the Crystal Palace Electrical Exhibition in London, England. He served on the awards jury for exhibits of dynamos, electric lights, and gas engines and wrote a 169-page report for the Department of the Navy. His report included a comparison of arc and incandescent lamps and predicted that “the incandescent lamp will generally take the place of the arc lamp.” He praised the Edison lighting system and wrote that Edison “without doubt, has done more than all others, and while his system is by no means yet perfect, it is unquestionably far ahead of the work of anyone else.”

Soon after he completed his report on the Crystal Palace exhibits, Sprague left the Navy to work for Edison. Sprague recognized the commercial potential of direct-current elec­tric motors and designed an

  exhibit featuring motors for an electrical exhibition in Philadelphia, PA, in 1884. He then left Edison to organize the Sprague Electric Railway and Motor Company, which found a growing market for small motors suitable for driving machine tools, printing presses, and household appliances. By 1889, it was reported that Sprague motors were “to be found in well nigh every city of the Union, to the aggregate of thousands of horsepower.”

In 1887, Sprague contracted to install a 12-mile electric street railway with 40 cars in the city of Richmond, VA (Fig. 2). The Richmond transit system became operational in 1888 and was widely regarded as the prototype for an industry that expanded to about 44000 miles of track by 1917. The success in Richmond led Sprague to present an AIEE paper entitled “The Solution of Municipal Rapid Transit” in June 1888. He stated in his introduction the importance of the transit issue, especially for cities such as New York, and expressed the hope that his

 

paper might precipitate a “general discussion of the subject, not only among electrical men but the general public as well.” He included economic data on existing horse railway systems and also compared his system with cable and steam railway systems. In addition to economic advantages, he wrote that “the riding of an electrical car is far easier than that of any cable or horse car, starting and stopping more easily, and being in a large measure free from lurching and oscillation.” He continued that “there is no dust such as rises from the heels of horses. The sanitary conditions are entirely altered, and the health and comfort of the whole population is conserved. Stables with all their unsavory characteristics and the consequent depreciation of the value of adjacent real estate disappear.”

 Sprague continued in his role of innovator through the development of vertical urban transportation in the form of the electric elevator. He organized the Sprague Elec­tric Elevator Company in 1892 after selling his previous company to Edison General Electric in 1890. He installed several hundred elevators before selling the business to the Otis Elevator Company. His work on elevator control led him to invent a multiple-unit control suitable for trains with individually powered cars (Fig. 3). This control system was introduced on the South Side Elevated Railway in

 Chicago, IL, in 1897. Sprague served on a commission appointed to arrange the electrification of Grand Central Terminal in New York City during 1903-1908. He remained a strong advocate of direct-current drive for interurban service such as that used by New York Central, which began using electric locomotives in 1906. (Fig. 4)

Sprague served as a member of the Naval Consulting Board during World War I. An earlier biographical sketch described him as “keen of glance, restless, and quick of thought and action.” It continued that “when taking part in public discussion he is simply the despair of stenographers, and like one of his own motors, maintains the speed no matter how great the load of argument.” Sprague died in 1934 at age 77.

James E. Brittain

 

Add comment November 9th, 2011

IEEE National News

  

IEEE-USA E-Book on Transition from School to Work to be Offered Free as Special Benefit to IEEE Members

 WASHINGTON (31 October 2011) — As a special benefit of IEEE membership for November, IEEE-USA is offering a free e-book, “Engineer’s Guide to Lifelong Employability: The Transition from School to Work.”

This e-book, prepared by the IEEE-USA Employment and Career Services Committee, provides a road map for the student preparing to enter the job market — what employers are looking for, how they can best find a job and what career paths are open to a new grad. Topics include:

* Finding a Job the Old-Fashioned Way
* Networking
* The Campus Interview
* Making up Your Mind
* Four Career Paths
* Business — Big or Small?
* A Non-Technology Company

“Demand for new BSEEs may be soaring, but so are employer’s standards and expectations,” writes Jean Eason, IEEE-USA Employment and Career Services Committee member. “Good grades and technical expertise aren’t enough anymore.”

From Nov. 1 through Nov. 30, “Engineer’s Guide to Lifelong Employability: The Transition from School to Work” can be downloaded at www.ieeeusa.org/communications/ebooks  for free to IEEE Members. The nonmember price is $5.99.

Members can purchase other IEEE-USA E-Books at deeply discounted prices and download other free e-books.

In December the free publication will be book three in the “Engineer’s Guide to Lifelong Employability” series: “What Are You Worth?”

Open Innovation for Security-Related Technology Challenges to be Featured at IEEE Homeland Security Conference

WASHINGTON (31 October 2011) — Open innovation approaches, such as the Innovation Access Network (IAN), are being increasingly used to find solutions to homeland security-related technology challenges.

Rick Mahoney, IAN vice president of business development, will be hosting a business panel, “Innovation Access Network — Fostering Homeland Security / Defense Innovation,” during the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST 11) on Wednesday 16 November at 10:30 a.m.

“The challenge faced by larger organizations is the inability to locate new innovative technologies,” Mahoney said. “For smaller companies, the challenge is finding those organizations that are actively searching in areas in which they are innovating. IAN is the connective tissue that brings innovators and seekers together.”

IAN (https://www.innovationaccess.org/), a division of the Massachusetts High Technology Council, brings together defense primes, entrepreneurs, large and small technology firms, universities, research labs and military and government agencies to share new ideas and technologies. Its goal is “to accelerate technology development and successful commercialization to create jobs and enhance economic development.”

HST 11 is 15-17 November at the Westin Waltham Boston in Waltham, Mass. Technical papers will be presented in four major areas:

* Cybersecurity
* Land and maritime border security
* Biometrics, forensics and physical security
* Attack and disaster preparation, recovery and response

Three additional business panels will focus on 1) homeland security technology commercialization, 2) alternative financing for small businesses and 3) doing business in the homeland security marketplace.

For more information and to register, visit www.ieee-hst.org or contact Robert Alongi at information@ieee-hst.org or +1 781-245-5405.

HST 11 is produced by IEEE with technical support from the Department of Homeland Security Science & Technology Directorate, the IEEE Biometrics Council and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Raytheon, MITRE and IEEE-USA are providing organizational support. Raytheon is the event platinum corporate sponsor, and Massport is the event gold corporate sponsor.

IEEE (www.ieee.org) is the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. IEEE-USA (www.ieeeusa.org) advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE.

‘How to do Business with Department of Homeland Security’ Among Featured Topics at IEEE Homeland Security Conference

WASHINGTON (25 October 2011) — Kristina Tanasichuk, founder and CEO of Government Technology and Services Coalition, will discuss “How to do Business with the Department of Homeland Security” at the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST 11) in November.

Tanasichuk, whose coalition advocates for small and medium security-focused companies in the federal security marketplace, is also president and founder of Women in Homeland Security. She will speak on a business panel, “Doing Business in the Homeland Security Marketplace,” on Tuesday 15 November at 4 p.m.

“The climate for small and mid-sized firms is extremely competitive in the current congressional budget environment — both for technology and services firms — yet there are many opportunities for companies that know where to look, how to develop their strategy and have reasonable expectations of the possibilities,” Tanasichuk said. “This panel will explain all the components of the process: relationship building, congressional impact, the technology transfer process and areas of investment within DHS.”

Joining Tanasichuk on the podium will be Chani Wiggins, former DHS assistant secretary for legislative affairs and principal at the Joseph Group, LLC; and Michael Kelly, executive advisor, homeland security & defense, The Analytic Sciences Corp.

HST 11 is 15-17 November at the Westin Waltham Boston in Waltham, Mass. The annual event gathers global science and technology thought leaders to foster homeland security technology innovation. Three additional business panels will focus on 1) alternative financing for small businesses, 2) homeland security technology commercialization and 3) fostering homeland security and defense innovation.
 
The event will also showcase peer-reviewed technical papers highlighting emerging technologies in four tracks:

* Cybersecurity
* Land and maritime border security
* Biometrics, forensics and physical security
* Attack and disaster preparation, recovery and response

For more information and to register, visit www.ieee-hst.org or contact Robert Alongi at information@ieee-hst.org or +1 781-245-5405.

The HST 11 Technical Program Committee, which reviewed the papers, is made up of leading science and technology experts from academia, national laboratories, federally funded research and development centers, the federal government and industry.

HST 11 is produced by IEEE with technical support from the DHS Science & Technology Directorate, the IEEE Biometrics Council and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Raytheon, MITRE and IEEE-USA are providing organizational support.

More than 380 people attended the 2010 conference, including representatives from at least 11 foreign countries. Raytheon is the event platinum corporate sponsor, and Massport is the event gold corporate sponsor.

IEEE (www.ieee.org) is the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. IEEE-USA (www.ieeeusa.org) advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE.

IEEE-USA Government Fellowships:

Each year, IEEE-USA sponsors three qualified IEEE members to serve as government fellows: one Engineering & Diplomacy Fellow and two Congressional fellows.  The fellows spend a year in Washington, serving as advisers to the U.S. Congress or key U.S. Department of State decision-makers.  IEEE-USA’s Government Fellowships link engineers with government, providing a mechanism for IEEE-USA members to learn firsthand about the public policy process through personal involvement.
The congressional fellowship consists of an appointment to the personal staff of a U.S. Senator or Congressman, or to the professional staff of a Congressional Committee. The Fellow along with the Congressional sponsor and IEEE-USA, negotiates a starting date, although IEEE-USA recommends that Fellowship terms run from January 1st to December 31st. For an application Kit for the 2010 Congressional Fellowship Program, visit: http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/govfel/cfapply.asp
The State Department fellowship begins in January of each year and offers an opportunity for an engineer to provide technical expertise to the State Department, and help raise awareness of the value of engineering input while learning about and contributing to the foreign policy process. For an application Kit for the 2013 Engineering & Diplomacy (State Department) Fellowship Program, visit: http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/govfel/state.asp
The postmark application deadline for 2013 Fellowships is 16 March 2012. For more information, visit: http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/govfel/default.asp
Washington Internships for Students of Engineering (WISE)

SUMMER 2012 PROGRAM Monday, 4 June – Friday, 3 August:
WISE seeks applications from outstanding engineering students who display evidence of leadership skills and have a keen interest in public policy. Minority students are encouraged to apply.
Applicants should select a sponsoring society(s), fill out an application form, write two (2) brief essays in response to questions, arrange for two (2)faculty references, and forward an official transcript. The deadline for Summer 2012 applications is December 31, 2011.  For more info and application forms, please visit: http://wise-intern.org/application/index.html
“…one of the best summers of my life. One which truly transformed my dreams and goals.  ….when I left D.C. I really wanted to instill in my fellow engineers the appreciation of the interaction between public policy and engineering.” — Marc Canellas, WISE 2011

 

Seminar on New Patent Law and its Potential Impact on Inventors, Investors and Engineering Managers Saturday at George Mason University

WASHINGTON (20 October 2011) — The America Invents Act that President Barack Obama signed into law last month represents the biggest change to U.S. patent law since 1870. IEEE-USA and its new Intellectual Property Professionals Initiative is hosting a seminar to help those interested in the patent process better understand the law’s potential impact.

“The New Patent Law and What it Means to You,” will be held at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., (Johnson Center, room C) on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch will be provided. The event will also be streamed live at http://www.ieeeusa.org/calendar/seminars/AIA-seminar/default.asp.

The seminar is designed to help inventors, investors and engineering managers mitigate risks, protect their inventions and adapt their business practices to the new law.

Janet Gongola, patent reform coordinator at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, will discuss the USPTO regulatory agenda. Additional speakers include intellectual property attorneys, many of whom specialize in technology patents. Panelists, their affiliations and topics are:

* Keith Grzelak, Wells St. John, PS, “Introduction & Overview of the America Invents Act”

* David Boundy, Cantor Fitzgerald, “First Inventor to File, Diminished Grace Period & Prior Art Issues”

* Charles Gholz, Oblon, Spivak, McClelland, Maier & Neustadt, LLP, “Derivation Law, Prior User Rights & Related Implications”

* Harold Wegner, Foley & Lardner LLP, “Patent Office Procedures, Appropriations, User Fees & Prioritized Examination — Adapting Prosecution Strategies to the America Invents Act”

* Robert Sterne, Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox PLLC, “Post Grant Review, Reexamination & Supplemental Examination”

* Michael Flibbert, Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP, “Impact on Patent Legislation”

For more information on the agenda and the speakers’ biographies, see http://www.ieeeusa.org/calendar/seminars/AIA-seminar/files/announcement.pdf.

IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE. http://www.ieeeusa.org

IEEE-USA Commends Introduction of High-Skill Immigration Reform Legislation

WASHINGTON (14 October 2011) — IEEE-USA endorses the “American Innovation and Education Act” introduced by Rep. Raul Labrador (R-Idaho), legislation that would make it easier for foreign-born students with advanced STEM degrees from U.S. institutions to fully participate in our nation’s economy.

Labrador’s bill, H.R. 3146, would make such students immediately eligible for a green card after earning their degrees if they have a job offer from a U.S. employer in their chosen field. Fees from these visas would fund improvements in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education and training for Americans.

“By giving foreign STEM graduates certainty in their pursuit of legal permanent residency, this bill will encourage the creation of new technology companies, create jobs and contribute to our country’s long-term competitiveness,” IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen said.

The legislation would also eliminate employment-based per-country limits for EB-2 visas (advance degree and professionals).

Research by AAES found that 55.3 percent of master’s and 63.3 percent of Ph.D. graduates from U.S. universities in electrical and electronics engineering are foreign nationals. Because of difficulties and long waits for permanent residency, many are returning to their home countries and establishing job-creating companies there rather than in the United States. This bill sends a clear signal to international students earning advanced degrees from American universities that America welcomes them.

“Unable to navigate the immigration process in a timely fashion, many of these graduates return to their countries of birth, where their talents and the knowledge and skills acquired in the U.S. are put to work for our foreign competitors,” Labrador said in a news release. “Our American universities are training the next generation of innovators and creators — and it is up to us to decide where they will create jobs.”

The Labrador bill contains provisions similar to those in the IDEA Act (Immigration Driving Entrepreneurship in America) introduced by Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) in June. IEEE-USA has long supported her efforts to advance high-skill visa reform.

IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE. http://www.ieeeusa.org

Ensuring Cybersecurity of Nuclear Power Plants to be Featured at IEEE Homeland Security Conference

WASHINGTON (14 October 2011) — An emerging threat to U.S. nuclear power plants is a cybersecurity attack that disrupts operations or compromises nuclear safety. A security system to protect against such an attack is one of the topics that will be presented at the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST 11) in November.

In the paper, “System-Aware Security for Nuclear Power Plants,” three Charlottesville, Va., researchers discuss how system-aware security can be combined with the nuclear turbine control system to avert the threat of cyber attacks, even if they have been built into the initial system components and triggered during maintenance, or activated by an insider.

“There are significant threats of embedded infections by the producers of equipment that support our nation’s nuclear power plants that cannot be completely addressed by advancing perimeter security solutions,” wrote Rick Jones and Barry Horowitz of the University of Virginia, and Troy Nguyen of the Northrop Grumman Corp. “In this paper, we lay out a new systems engineering-focused approach for addressing these threats.”

Jones will present the paper during HST 11 at the Westin Waltham Boston in Waltham, Mass., USA, 15-17 November 2011. For more information and to register, visit www.ieee-hst.org or contact Robert Alongi at information@ieee-hst.org or +1 781-245-5405.

HST 11 will bring together global science and technology thought leaders to foster homeland security technology innovation. It will showcase selected technical papers highlighting emerging technologies in four tracks:

— Cybersecurity
— Attack and disaster preparation, recovery and response
— Land and maritime border security
— Biometrics, forensics and physical security

Additionally, the conference features business panels that address effective business strategies in the current homeland security market.

The HST 11 Technical Program Committee, which reviewed the papers, is made up of leading science and technology experts from academia, national laboratories, federally funded research and development centers, the federal government and industry.

HST 11 is produced by IEEE with technical support from the Department of Homeland Security Science & Technology Directorate, the IEEE Biometrics Council and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Raytheon, MITRE and IEEE-USA are providing organizational support.

More than 380 people attended the 2010 conference, including representatives from at least 11 foreign countries. Raytheon is the event platinum corporate sponsor, and Massport is the event gold corporate sponsor.

Add comment November 9th, 2011

 

 ASME Cincinnati Section November Social Media (Free) Workshop Announcement

 IEEE/ASME Cincinnati Section Members,

 Don’t be the last to know how to safely and securely use Facebook, Linked-In, and other social media. 

Also the engineering and applied science library at UC has freely-available resources to help solve many problems. 

 Receive 2.0 CPD hours toward Annual Licensure at the November “Safe and Secure Social Media Workshop”

 The workshop will be held on a work night from 6:00 to 8:00 PM. 

Generic Logins and computers will be provided. 

 ASME Cincinnati Section: November Social Media Training

 What:       Safe and Secure Social Media Training for Facebook, Linked-In, etc.                      

                 Speaker:  Ted Baldwin

                 Title “How to Effectively and Wisely use Social Media”

                 Generic Logins to computers will be provided

 1.              2.0 hours of training and hands on experience

 2.              An intro to social media and how to use it wisely, 

 3.              Instruction on how the ASME Cincinnati section can create a Facebook page, 

 4.              A presentation of resources at UC’s libraries

 Where:      University of Cincinnati

                  College of Engineering and Applied Science

                  Engineering and Applied Science Library

                  Baldwin Hall 8th Floor

                  Computer lab 860D

 When:       November 16

                  Please RSVP to cri6@cdc.gov 

                  5:30 to 6:00 PM Social hour snack and drinks will be provided. 

                  6:00 to 8:00 PM workshop training in the Computer Lab.

 Cost:         Free

 Food         Snacks and drinks will be provided outside of the library. 

                 The University has a Food Court. 

                 There are numerous local restaurants.                  

 Abstract              

 Social media such as Linked-In, Facebook, Twitter, etc …  are becoming vital for maintaining a career and working with younger engineers.  This workshop will show how to use social media effectively and safely.  Additionally the UC engineering and applied science library has many resources for helping engineers to solve technical problems.  Learn how to utilize the library’s resources.

Add comment November 6th, 2011

USGBC- Operational Benefits of LEED: A Tour of the United Way of Greater Cincinnati Headquarters Renovation

11/10/2011

5:00 PM- 7:00 PM, United Way of Greater Cincinnati

A unique opportunity to learn about the recent LEED-registered United Way building renovation (LEED Cl v2009) and the operational benefits afforded by the LEED process. Also a great way to support a local charitable organization: the United Way of Greater Cincinnati.

 The building was erected in 1915 and is currently on track to receive LEED-CI (v2009) Gold Certification and will deliver over $150,000 annually in energy savings to the United Way.

 Learn about the process of the LEED system from representatives from the USGBC Cincinnati Regional Chapter, Green Building Auditors, Duke Energy, and GBBN Architects as they detail the steps taken to achieve a 55% decrease in energy usage and huge operational budget savings.

 The brief presentation session will be followed by a tour of the newly renovated facility with refreshments (small food and drinks).

 Speakers:

  • Tony Yunkers (Architect, GBBN Cincinnati),
  • Carol Burwick (Research Analyst, Duke Energy), and
  • John Kirschner (President, Green Building Auditors)

 $5.00 of each ticket sold will be donated to the United Way’s annual campaign. Each attendee will also receive a certificate of attendance for use in self-reporting CEUs for GBCI, BOMA, IFMA and NAIOP.

For additional information:  http://www.usgbc-cincinnati.org/

Add comment November 2nd, 2011

Fukushima and the Future of Nuclear Energy in the U.S.

RESC November 15 Program, PE CE Credit

by Dr. Richard Denning, University of Cincinnati

See the web site for details and reservations  www.resc.org

Dr. Denning will describe what actually happened in the Fukushima accident and provide an evaluation of the failure in safety practices that led to severe fuel damage. He will also discuss the expected health, environmental, and economic consequences of the event. Risk studies indicate that a similar “station blackout” accident could occur in the U.S. but at a very low probability. Dr. Denning will describe some differences in the capabilities of U.S. plants similar in design to the Japanese plants to mitigate the consequences of such an event. The NRC has issued their 90-day report with recommendations regarding upgrades that could be required in operating plants in the U.S. He will discuss the implications to plans for life extension of current plants, planned power updates, and prospects for new power plant designs that don’t require AC power to achieve safe shutdown.

Add comment November 2nd, 2011


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