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IEEE NATIONAL NEWS

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White House Official, Environmental Policy Analyst to Deliver Keynotes at Carbon Management Technology Conference in Orlando in February

WASHINGTON (28 December 2011) — Katharine Jacobs of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Robert Fri, visiting scholar at Resources for the Future, will deliver keynote addresses at the first Carbon Management Technology Conference, 7-9 February 2012 in Orlando, Fla.

Jacobs, assistant director, climate adaptation and assessment in the OSTP Environment and Energy Division, will discuss “Climate Change Adaptation in the United States” on Tuesday, 7 February. Fri, who has more than 35 years experience as an administrator and analyst of energy and environmental policy, will discuss “America’s Climate Choices” the next day.

The conference, sponsored by eight engineering societies, will bring together key stakeholders to share the latest technologies, strategies and systems related to the management and containment of carbon production. The technical program features more than 200 presentations on key topics such as business risks of carbon counting, innovative approaches to measuring IT system sustainability, research and development, and greenhouse gas quantification and measurement methods.

“Engineers from a wide range of engineering disciplines will share their perspectives on reducing greenhouse gas emissions and adaptation to the risks of climate change,” said Haroon Kheshgi, conference chair and head of ExxonMobil’s global climate change science program.

Jim Howard, 2012 IEEE-USA president, is scheduled to be a panelist on the opening plenary session, “Leading Engineering Engagement in Carbon Management.” For more on the technical program, see http://www.carbonmgmt.org/pages/schedule/tech%20program/index.php.

For more information and to register, go to http://www.carbonmgmt.org/.

The Carbon Management Technology Conference is sponsored and organized by IEEE-USA, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Association for Iron and Steel Technology, the Society for Mining, Metallurgy & Exploration, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society and the Society of Petroleum Engineers. It is also supported in part by a grant from the United Engineering Foundation.

For sponsorship and advertising opportunities, see http://www.carbonmgmt.org/pages/sponsorship/index.php.

 IEEE-USA Supports Inventors’ Rights in Brief before U.S. Supreme Court, Oral Arguments Heard Today

 WASHINGTON (9 January 2012) — A brief IEEE-USA filed in support of inventors’ rights was part of a case the U.S. Supreme Court heard today.

“The court reviewed inventors’ rights this morning and IEEE-USA was pleased to take the side of innovators and major technology companies,” said Chris Katopis, a Washington, D.C., intellectual property attorney and former U.S. Patent and Trade Office executive who wrote the amicus curiae (friend of the court) brief on behalf of IEEE-USA.

The question before the court in Kappos v. Hyatt is whether an inventor who has been denied a patent by the PTO may present new evidence that the person had but did not present in the original application. In a 6-2-1 appellate decision, the Federal Circuit ruled in November 2010 that the PTO must accept a petitioner’s new evidence.

In its brief – which has been paraphrased – IEEE-USA wrote:

IEEE-USA recognizes the important role of judicial review – namely preserving an inventor’s access to the courts – as established by Congress in the 1836 Patent Act, as a check on the PTO’s judgment, procedural regularity and patent quality. Today’s case raises crucial questions concerning the nature and scope of a civil action pursuant to the act and an inventor’s rights upon judicial review. The Patent Act provides a statutory basis for a disappointed patent applicant to introduce new evidence and to have the evidence reviewed de novo (anew) by a district court. Second, the case will help define the PTO director’s ultimate rule-making authority under the Administrative Procedure Act, especially concerning patent application examination processes and judicial review. This case deals with important substantive and procedural questions regarding inventors’ rights and patent law, areas of law important to U.S. IEEE members and the innovation ecosystem for scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs and investors.

The IEEE-USA brief is accessible at http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/policy/2011/090611.pdf 

‘Electrons Don’t Come From Heaven,’ Speaker will Say at Carbon Management Technology Conference in Orlando

WASHINGTON (25 January 2012) — Heated discussions are underway concerning the impact of advanced electric vehicles (EVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and current hybrid EVs on energy efficiency and the environment. A panel of experts will examine these issues during the Carbon Management Technology Conference, 7-9 February 2012 in Orlando, Fla.

“My key point is to remind everyone that electrons don’t come from heaven,” said Dale Simbeck, vice president, technology of SFA Pacific. “I see that way too often in promoting electric vehicles.”

Simbeck will be joined by Drs. Veronika Rabl and Saifur Rahman in discussing “Issues in Assessing Electric and Hybrid Transportation,” on Wednesday 8 February from 1:30-3 p.m.

Simbeck was a lead author of the 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change special report, “Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage: A Summary for Policymakers.” His presentation will include a look at the source energy needed to generate the electricity to power EVs and PHEVs.

Rabl is IEEE’s lead technical member of the Engineering Founder Societies Technology for Carbon Management Grand Challenge Initiative. Vice chair of the IEEE-USA Energy Policy Committee, she will talk about reasons for electrifying the transportation system, including decarbonization, oil displacement, increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact.

Rahman, an IEEE Fellow, is the Joseph Loring Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. He plans to discuss the impact and challenges of large-scale EV penetration at the transmission and distribution level.

“If you were to add a million EVs today spread around the United States, no one would notice it at the transmission level,” Rahman said. “But if you put two EVs on a street on the same transformer, you’ve got a problem unless we can manage other loads — such as the electric water heater, clothes dryer, air conditioner and electric oven.”

The CMTC technical program will feature more than 200 presentations on key topics such as business risks of carbon counting, climate change effects on engineering design environments and integrating carbon management technologies into the power grid. See http://www.carbonmgmt.org/pages/schedule/tech%20program/index.php.

To register, go to http://www.carbonmgmt.org/.

February 7th, 2012

IEEE NATIONAL

IEEE Green Technologies Conference Extends Deadline for Papers on Current & Emerging Renewable Energy Sources & Energy-Reduction Technologies
WASHINGTON (21 November 2011) — IEEE Green Technologies Conference organizers have extended the deadline for technical papers to 1 December.

Papers can be submitted at http://edas.info/N11261, and authors will be notified on 4 January 2012 whether their papers are accepted. For more information on the event, see http://www.ieeegreentech.org/.

Accepted papers will be presented during the fourth-annual conference, 19-20 April 2012, at Oral Roberts University and the Hilton Tulsa (Okla.) Southern Hills. They will also be published in a conference proceedings CD and available through the digital library IEEE Xplore.

Contributed papers on topics related to current and emerging renewable energy sources and energy-reduction technologies are solicited in – but not limited to – the following areas:

* Energy generation and storage technologies, including nuclear, wind, solar, water, geothermal,
biomass, energy harvesting and storage
* Energy usage reduction and conservation, including energy management, planning and forecasting, home and commercial automation, innovative HVAC and lighting
* Architectural and engineering sustainable designs, including strategies for sustainability, performance evaluation, use of green building components and system management
* Environmental, legal, social, economic and political impacts, including emerging standards for
renewable and reduced carbon emission energy sources, safety and technologies for developed and underdeveloped countries
* Smart Grid communication and control, including evolution and integration of renewable and reduced emission energy sources
* Environmental protection, including oil spill prevention and control 
* Green IT and sustainable computing, including IT de-manufacturing and legitimate recycling; energy-efficient IT solutions; network concepts and architectures for lowering energy consumption; energy efficient algorithms; sensor networks for climate and disaster monitoring; and power-aware software design and development 
* Biofuels and emerging fuels technology, i.e. generating combustion fuels from renewable sources such as algae, non-food plants and vegetable oils

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Because of increasing concerns about fossil fuel costs, supplies and emissions, scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs are more closely examining the commercial viability of renewable energy sources. The 2012 IEEE Green Technologies Conference aims to look at solar, wind, nuclear, geothermal, hydro and biomass technologies, among others, as well as alternative vehicle power sources such as fuel cells, gasoline and liquid natural gas electric hybrids and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

The event is sponsored by IEEE Region 5, the Tulsa Section, Oral Roberts University, IEEE-USA and the Boeing Co.

Questions can be directed to 2012 IEEE Green Technologies Chair Sophie Liu at sliu@oru.edu.

EXHIBIT & SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES:
If you are interested in sponsoring or exhibiting at the conference, please contact Colonel Mason at 214-329-4949 or colonel@prfirm1.com.

Cornell University Student Chosen IEEE/IEEE-USA’s “New Face of Engineering College Edition”

WASHINGTON (8 December 2011) — Jeremy Blum, an electrical and computer engineering major at Cornell University, is the first IEEE student member to be recognized as the IEEE/IEEE-USA’s “New Face of Engineering College Edition.” IEEE is the world’s largest professional association for the advancement of technology.

Administered by the National Engineers Week Foundation, “College Edition” recognizes third-, fourth- and fifth-year students enrolled in a bachelor of science engineering program at an ABET-accredited college or equivalent international institution with a minimum 3.0 grade-point average. Winners are honored for academic excellence, leadership within student organizations, outstanding communication skills, non-engineering related community service and participation in the engineering industry.

Blum is the founder and director of Cornell University Sustainable Design (CUSD), an interdisciplinary 150-member team that pursues environmentally inspired design-build projects. One project was a schoolhouse in South Africa. Blum also built the control system for a solar-powered house that entered the 2009 U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon. He is leading an effort to build a sustainability research facility at Cornell. He has released hundreds of videos, tutorials and projects on his YouTube channel (www.youtube.com/user/sciguy14). Between that and his blog (http://www.jeremyblum.com/blog/), the senior has tens of thousands of online followers.

Blum enjoys sharing his zeal for engineering with children. In November he and other CUSD students taught youngsters at the Brooklyn (N.Y.) Children’s Museum how to re-purpose soda bottles into hanging gardens. Last summer he taught several classes at the Harlem Children’s Zone about sustainable engineering and renewable energy.

“When I’m teaching young kids about engineering, I always start with this: ‘engineers change the world,'” Blum said. “I then go on to explain that electrical engineers are responsible for many of the things they likely take for granted, like iPods, computers, cell phones and more. I also tell them that engineers are problem solvers. When presented with information, an engineer’s job isn’t just to analyze it but to take that data and do something unthinkable and innovative with it.”

Blum thinks his IEEE membership has been greatly beneficial.

“Being a member of IEEE has been critical for expanding my network and meeting other amazing people whom I’ve been able to work with on various projects,” he said. “I’m consistently amazed by all the smart electrical engineering students and teachers at Cornell, and IEEE has been the ideal place to find them. I also think having access to IEEE’s vast network of technical papers has been invaluable in conducting my research.”

The IEEE/IEEE-USA portion of the “College Edition” contest was open to IEEE student members around the world. For more on all the winners, see www.facebook.com/CollegeEdition.

IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE. For information on the benefits of IEEE membership, see http://www.ieee.org/join.

Web: http://www.ieeeusa.org
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ieeeusa
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/ieeeusa

Add comment December 15th, 2011

IEEE National News

  

IEEE-USA E-Book on Transition from School to Work to be Offered Free as Special Benefit to IEEE Members

 WASHINGTON (31 October 2011) — As a special benefit of IEEE membership for November, IEEE-USA is offering a free e-book, “Engineer’s Guide to Lifelong Employability: The Transition from School to Work.”

This e-book, prepared by the IEEE-USA Employment and Career Services Committee, provides a road map for the student preparing to enter the job market — what employers are looking for, how they can best find a job and what career paths are open to a new grad. Topics include:

* Finding a Job the Old-Fashioned Way
* Networking
* The Campus Interview
* Making up Your Mind
* Four Career Paths
* Business — Big or Small?
* A Non-Technology Company

“Demand for new BSEEs may be soaring, but so are employer’s standards and expectations,” writes Jean Eason, IEEE-USA Employment and Career Services Committee member. “Good grades and technical expertise aren’t enough anymore.”

From Nov. 1 through Nov. 30, “Engineer’s Guide to Lifelong Employability: The Transition from School to Work” can be downloaded at www.ieeeusa.org/communications/ebooks  for free to IEEE Members. The nonmember price is $5.99.

Members can purchase other IEEE-USA E-Books at deeply discounted prices and download other free e-books.

In December the free publication will be book three in the “Engineer’s Guide to Lifelong Employability” series: “What Are You Worth?”

Open Innovation for Security-Related Technology Challenges to be Featured at IEEE Homeland Security Conference

WASHINGTON (31 October 2011) — Open innovation approaches, such as the Innovation Access Network (IAN), are being increasingly used to find solutions to homeland security-related technology challenges.

Rick Mahoney, IAN vice president of business development, will be hosting a business panel, “Innovation Access Network — Fostering Homeland Security / Defense Innovation,” during the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST 11) on Wednesday 16 November at 10:30 a.m.

“The challenge faced by larger organizations is the inability to locate new innovative technologies,” Mahoney said. “For smaller companies, the challenge is finding those organizations that are actively searching in areas in which they are innovating. IAN is the connective tissue that brings innovators and seekers together.”

IAN (https://www.innovationaccess.org/), a division of the Massachusetts High Technology Council, brings together defense primes, entrepreneurs, large and small technology firms, universities, research labs and military and government agencies to share new ideas and technologies. Its goal is “to accelerate technology development and successful commercialization to create jobs and enhance economic development.”

HST 11 is 15-17 November at the Westin Waltham Boston in Waltham, Mass. Technical papers will be presented in four major areas:

* Cybersecurity
* Land and maritime border security
* Biometrics, forensics and physical security
* Attack and disaster preparation, recovery and response

Three additional business panels will focus on 1) homeland security technology commercialization, 2) alternative financing for small businesses and 3) doing business in the homeland security marketplace.

For more information and to register, visit www.ieee-hst.org or contact Robert Alongi at information@ieee-hst.org or +1 781-245-5405.

HST 11 is produced by IEEE with technical support from the Department of Homeland Security Science & Technology Directorate, the IEEE Biometrics Council and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Raytheon, MITRE and IEEE-USA are providing organizational support. Raytheon is the event platinum corporate sponsor, and Massport is the event gold corporate sponsor.

IEEE (www.ieee.org) is the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. IEEE-USA (www.ieeeusa.org) advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE.

‘How to do Business with Department of Homeland Security’ Among Featured Topics at IEEE Homeland Security Conference

WASHINGTON (25 October 2011) — Kristina Tanasichuk, founder and CEO of Government Technology and Services Coalition, will discuss “How to do Business with the Department of Homeland Security” at the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST 11) in November.

Tanasichuk, whose coalition advocates for small and medium security-focused companies in the federal security marketplace, is also president and founder of Women in Homeland Security. She will speak on a business panel, “Doing Business in the Homeland Security Marketplace,” on Tuesday 15 November at 4 p.m.

“The climate for small and mid-sized firms is extremely competitive in the current congressional budget environment — both for technology and services firms — yet there are many opportunities for companies that know where to look, how to develop their strategy and have reasonable expectations of the possibilities,” Tanasichuk said. “This panel will explain all the components of the process: relationship building, congressional impact, the technology transfer process and areas of investment within DHS.”

Joining Tanasichuk on the podium will be Chani Wiggins, former DHS assistant secretary for legislative affairs and principal at the Joseph Group, LLC; and Michael Kelly, executive advisor, homeland security & defense, The Analytic Sciences Corp.

HST 11 is 15-17 November at the Westin Waltham Boston in Waltham, Mass. The annual event gathers global science and technology thought leaders to foster homeland security technology innovation. Three additional business panels will focus on 1) alternative financing for small businesses, 2) homeland security technology commercialization and 3) fostering homeland security and defense innovation.
 
The event will also showcase peer-reviewed technical papers highlighting emerging technologies in four tracks:

* Cybersecurity
* Land and maritime border security
* Biometrics, forensics and physical security
* Attack and disaster preparation, recovery and response

For more information and to register, visit www.ieee-hst.org or contact Robert Alongi at information@ieee-hst.org or +1 781-245-5405.

The HST 11 Technical Program Committee, which reviewed the papers, is made up of leading science and technology experts from academia, national laboratories, federally funded research and development centers, the federal government and industry.

HST 11 is produced by IEEE with technical support from the DHS Science & Technology Directorate, the IEEE Biometrics Council and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Raytheon, MITRE and IEEE-USA are providing organizational support.

More than 380 people attended the 2010 conference, including representatives from at least 11 foreign countries. Raytheon is the event platinum corporate sponsor, and Massport is the event gold corporate sponsor.

IEEE (www.ieee.org) is the world’s largest professional association dedicated to advancing technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. IEEE-USA (www.ieeeusa.org) advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE.

IEEE-USA Government Fellowships:

Each year, IEEE-USA sponsors three qualified IEEE members to serve as government fellows: one Engineering & Diplomacy Fellow and two Congressional fellows.  The fellows spend a year in Washington, serving as advisers to the U.S. Congress or key U.S. Department of State decision-makers.  IEEE-USA’s Government Fellowships link engineers with government, providing a mechanism for IEEE-USA members to learn firsthand about the public policy process through personal involvement.
The congressional fellowship consists of an appointment to the personal staff of a U.S. Senator or Congressman, or to the professional staff of a Congressional Committee. The Fellow along with the Congressional sponsor and IEEE-USA, negotiates a starting date, although IEEE-USA recommends that Fellowship terms run from January 1st to December 31st. For an application Kit for the 2010 Congressional Fellowship Program, visit: http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/govfel/cfapply.asp
The State Department fellowship begins in January of each year and offers an opportunity for an engineer to provide technical expertise to the State Department, and help raise awareness of the value of engineering input while learning about and contributing to the foreign policy process. For an application Kit for the 2013 Engineering & Diplomacy (State Department) Fellowship Program, visit: http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/govfel/state.asp
The postmark application deadline for 2013 Fellowships is 16 March 2012. For more information, visit: http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/govfel/default.asp
Washington Internships for Students of Engineering (WISE)

SUMMER 2012 PROGRAM Monday, 4 June – Friday, 3 August:
WISE seeks applications from outstanding engineering students who display evidence of leadership skills and have a keen interest in public policy. Minority students are encouraged to apply.
Applicants should select a sponsoring society(s), fill out an application form, write two (2) brief essays in response to questions, arrange for two (2)faculty references, and forward an official transcript. The deadline for Summer 2012 applications is December 31, 2011.  For more info and application forms, please visit: http://wise-intern.org/application/index.html
“…one of the best summers of my life. One which truly transformed my dreams and goals.  ….when I left D.C. I really wanted to instill in my fellow engineers the appreciation of the interaction between public policy and engineering.” — Marc Canellas, WISE 2011

 

Seminar on New Patent Law and its Potential Impact on Inventors, Investors and Engineering Managers Saturday at George Mason University

WASHINGTON (20 October 2011) — The America Invents Act that President Barack Obama signed into law last month represents the biggest change to U.S. patent law since 1870. IEEE-USA and its new Intellectual Property Professionals Initiative is hosting a seminar to help those interested in the patent process better understand the law’s potential impact.

“The New Patent Law and What it Means to You,” will be held at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., (Johnson Center, room C) on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch will be provided. The event will also be streamed live at http://www.ieeeusa.org/calendar/seminars/AIA-seminar/default.asp.

The seminar is designed to help inventors, investors and engineering managers mitigate risks, protect their inventions and adapt their business practices to the new law.

Janet Gongola, patent reform coordinator at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, will discuss the USPTO regulatory agenda. Additional speakers include intellectual property attorneys, many of whom specialize in technology patents. Panelists, their affiliations and topics are:

* Keith Grzelak, Wells St. John, PS, “Introduction & Overview of the America Invents Act”

* David Boundy, Cantor Fitzgerald, “First Inventor to File, Diminished Grace Period & Prior Art Issues”

* Charles Gholz, Oblon, Spivak, McClelland, Maier & Neustadt, LLP, “Derivation Law, Prior User Rights & Related Implications”

* Harold Wegner, Foley & Lardner LLP, “Patent Office Procedures, Appropriations, User Fees & Prioritized Examination — Adapting Prosecution Strategies to the America Invents Act”

* Robert Sterne, Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox PLLC, “Post Grant Review, Reexamination & Supplemental Examination”

* Michael Flibbert, Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP, “Impact on Patent Legislation”

For more information on the agenda and the speakers’ biographies, see http://www.ieeeusa.org/calendar/seminars/AIA-seminar/files/announcement.pdf.

IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE. http://www.ieeeusa.org

IEEE-USA Commends Introduction of High-Skill Immigration Reform Legislation

WASHINGTON (14 October 2011) — IEEE-USA endorses the “American Innovation and Education Act” introduced by Rep. Raul Labrador (R-Idaho), legislation that would make it easier for foreign-born students with advanced STEM degrees from U.S. institutions to fully participate in our nation’s economy.

Labrador’s bill, H.R. 3146, would make such students immediately eligible for a green card after earning their degrees if they have a job offer from a U.S. employer in their chosen field. Fees from these visas would fund improvements in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education and training for Americans.

“By giving foreign STEM graduates certainty in their pursuit of legal permanent residency, this bill will encourage the creation of new technology companies, create jobs and contribute to our country’s long-term competitiveness,” IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen said.

The legislation would also eliminate employment-based per-country limits for EB-2 visas (advance degree and professionals).

Research by AAES found that 55.3 percent of master’s and 63.3 percent of Ph.D. graduates from U.S. universities in electrical and electronics engineering are foreign nationals. Because of difficulties and long waits for permanent residency, many are returning to their home countries and establishing job-creating companies there rather than in the United States. This bill sends a clear signal to international students earning advanced degrees from American universities that America welcomes them.

“Unable to navigate the immigration process in a timely fashion, many of these graduates return to their countries of birth, where their talents and the knowledge and skills acquired in the U.S. are put to work for our foreign competitors,” Labrador said in a news release. “Our American universities are training the next generation of innovators and creators — and it is up to us to decide where they will create jobs.”

The Labrador bill contains provisions similar to those in the IDEA Act (Immigration Driving Entrepreneurship in America) introduced by Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.) in June. IEEE-USA has long supported her efforts to advance high-skill visa reform.

IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE. http://www.ieeeusa.org

Ensuring Cybersecurity of Nuclear Power Plants to be Featured at IEEE Homeland Security Conference

WASHINGTON (14 October 2011) — An emerging threat to U.S. nuclear power plants is a cybersecurity attack that disrupts operations or compromises nuclear safety. A security system to protect against such an attack is one of the topics that will be presented at the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST 11) in November.

In the paper, “System-Aware Security for Nuclear Power Plants,” three Charlottesville, Va., researchers discuss how system-aware security can be combined with the nuclear turbine control system to avert the threat of cyber attacks, even if they have been built into the initial system components and triggered during maintenance, or activated by an insider.

“There are significant threats of embedded infections by the producers of equipment that support our nation’s nuclear power plants that cannot be completely addressed by advancing perimeter security solutions,” wrote Rick Jones and Barry Horowitz of the University of Virginia, and Troy Nguyen of the Northrop Grumman Corp. “In this paper, we lay out a new systems engineering-focused approach for addressing these threats.”

Jones will present the paper during HST 11 at the Westin Waltham Boston in Waltham, Mass., USA, 15-17 November 2011. For more information and to register, visit www.ieee-hst.org or contact Robert Alongi at information@ieee-hst.org or +1 781-245-5405.

HST 11 will bring together global science and technology thought leaders to foster homeland security technology innovation. It will showcase selected technical papers highlighting emerging technologies in four tracks:

— Cybersecurity
— Attack and disaster preparation, recovery and response
— Land and maritime border security
— Biometrics, forensics and physical security

Additionally, the conference features business panels that address effective business strategies in the current homeland security market.

The HST 11 Technical Program Committee, which reviewed the papers, is made up of leading science and technology experts from academia, national laboratories, federally funded research and development centers, the federal government and industry.

HST 11 is produced by IEEE with technical support from the Department of Homeland Security Science & Technology Directorate, the IEEE Biometrics Council and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Raytheon, MITRE and IEEE-USA are providing organizational support.

More than 380 people attended the 2010 conference, including representatives from at least 11 foreign countries. Raytheon is the event platinum corporate sponsor, and Massport is the event gold corporate sponsor.

Add comment November 9th, 2011

IEEE National News

Stories in this Edition:

  • Small Business Innovation Research, Technology Infrastructure Can Help Create Jobs
  • Advice for Current & Potential Consultants Featured in Latest IEEE-USA E-book
  • IEEE/IEEE-USA Seek Nominations for 2012 New Faces of Engineering Recognition; College Edition Program Started
  • Paid Summer 2012 Internship At Mass Media News Outlet Available to U.S. IEEE Student Members
  • Median Income of Electrotechnology, IT Professionals Rises to $118,000; Communications Technology Workers Report Highest Income, IEEE-USA Salary Survey Reveals
  • ‘IEEE-USA in ACTION’ App Available in iTunes Store
  • IEEE-USA E-Book on Résumés First to be Offered Free as Special Benefit to IEEE Members

All Stories are available at the IEEE National section of our site:  http://www.ieeecincinnati.org/category/ieee-national/

Small Business Innovation Research, Technology Infrastructure Can Help Create Jobs

WASHINGTON (9 September 2011) — To help encourage job growth, Congress should reauthorize the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and invest in America’s technology infrastructure.

During his speech to Congress last night, President Barack Obama specifically cited small businesses as a key to job creation. “Everyone here knows that small businesses are where most new jobs begin,” Obama said. “And you know that while corporate profits have come roaring back, smaller companies haven’t.”  

One simple way that Congress can immediately help small technology companies is by passing a long-term SBIR reauthorization.

SBIR is a competitive, federally funded program that helps small companies conduct research into new technology. But because Congress has failed to pass a long-term SBIR reauthorization, companies cannot be sure of the program’s reliability.

“High-tech entrepreneurs are job creators, and our country should do everything we can to support them,” IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen said. “Congress’ failure to reauthorize the program for more than a year at a time has created uncertainty among small technology companies, and uncertainty breeds hesitation, which breeds stagnation. Congress could end this uncertainty by passing a long-term reauthorization of the program.”

Obama also highlighted the important role that infrastructure investments play in the economic health of our country. But Congress should recognize that infrastructure in the 21st century must include a robust and intelligent electrical grid. The recent blackout in parts of Southern California, Arizona and Mexico demonstrates that our grid needs to be strengthened. Emerging technologies offer innovative ways to increase the reliability and efficiency of the system.  

“A reliable, efficient and affordable electric grid and IT infrastructure can power job growth across our country,” Jensen said. “Investing in our nation’s electrical infrastructure not only creates jobs today but also lays the foundation for a strong economy tomorrow.”

Small Business Innovation Research, Technology Infrastructure Can Help Create Jobs

WASHINGTON (9 September 2011) — To help encourage job growth, Congress should reauthorize the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and invest in America’s technology infrastructure.

During his speech to Congress last night, President Barack Obama specifically cited small businesses as a key to job creation. “Everyone here knows that small businesses are where most new jobs begin,” Obama said. “And you know that while corporate profits have come roaring back, smaller companies haven’t.”  

One simple way that Congress can immediately help small technology companies is by passing a long-term SBIR reauthorization.

SBIR is a competitive, federally funded program that helps small companies conduct research into new technology. But because Congress has failed to pass a long-term SBIR reauthorization, companies cannot be sure of the program’s reliability.

“High-tech entrepreneurs are job creators, and our country should do everything we can to support them,” IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen said. “Congress’ failure to reauthorize the program for more than a year at a time has created uncertainty among small technology companies, and uncertainty breeds hesitation, which breeds stagnation. Congress could end this uncertainty by passing a long-term reauthorization of the program.”

Obama also highlighted the important role that infrastructure investments play in the economic health of our country. But Congress should recognize that infrastructure in the 21st century must include a robust and intelligent electrical grid. The recent blackout in parts of Southern California, Arizona and Mexico demonstrates that our grid needs to be strengthened. Emerging technologies offer innovative ways to increase the reliability and efficiency of the system.  

“A reliable, efficient and affordable electric grid and IT infrastructure can power job growth across our country,” Jensen said. “Investing in our nation’s electrical infrastructure not only creates jobs today but also lays the foundation for a strong economy tomorrow.”

Advice for Current & Potential Consultants Featured in Latest IEEE-USA E-book

WASHINGTON (13 September 2011) — Many engineers, for various reasons, are thinking about becoming independent consultants. But the skills required to go out on your own are not taught in engineering schools, writes William Kassebaum, P.E., in the introduction to “The Best of IEEE-USA Today’s Engineer: On Consulting — Volume 2.”

“Many engineers are apprehensive about making the transition from a salaried position with predictable weekly or monthly earnings, to a situation where the perception is that income would be uncertain and irregular,” said Kassebaum, chair of the IEEE Alliance of Consultants Networks Coordinating Committee. “Almost all experienced consultants were once company employees. They made the change, and most of them will say it was the wisest career and business decision they ever made.”

This second volume of articles, which originally ran in “IEEE-USA Today’s Engineer,” is an IEEE-USA e-book compilation of nine consulting-related stories. A sampling includes, “Consulting: The Dawn of a New Era;” “Moonlighting Engineers: The Consultant Stands Alone;” “Is It Your Time To Be An Entrepreneur;” and “Using Social Media to Attract New Business.”

The publication also features the “2010 Profile of IEEE Consultants,” which is based on the “2010 IEEE-USA Salary and Fringe Benefits Survey.” The profile provides information on things like average number of hours consultants worked per week (27.1) and median billing rate ($120).

You can purchase your copy of “The Best of IEEE-USA Today’s Engineer: On Consulting — Volume 2” at www.ieeeusa.org/communications/ebooks for the IEEE member price: $4.79. Nonmember price is $5.99.

IEEE members can purchase other IEEE-USA E-Books at deeply discounted member prices — and download some free e-books at www.ieeeusa.org/communications/ebooks.

IEEE/IEEE-USA Seek Nominations for 2012 New Faces of Engineering Recognition; College Edition Program Started

WASHINGTON (16 September 2011) — Nominations are now open for IEEE members under 30 to be recognized as the IEEE/IEEE-USA’s 2012 “New Face of Engineering.” In addition, a “College Edition” program for IEEE student members has started.

The Engineers Week (EWeek) “New Faces of Engineering” program recognizes engineers new to the profession with outstanding educational and career accomplishments. The program is open to IEEE members worldwide.

To be eligible for recognition, engineers must be 30 or younger as of 31 December 2011, and have a degree in engineering or computer engineering from a recognized U.S. college or equivalent international educational institution.

Judges will evaluate nominees based on their educational attainment, engineering achievements and participation and accomplishments in professional and technical society activities. Particular consideration is given to work (e.g. volunteering, publishing, conference presentations) in IEEE technical societies.
       
IEEE nominations should be directed to Sharon Richardson at s.richardson@ieee.org. Self-nominations are not permitted. The nomination form and more information are available at http://www.ieeeusa.org/communications/eweek/newfaces/default.asp.  

The nomination deadline is 21 October 2011.

The IEEE/IEEE-USA top choice will be featured during EWeek (19-25 February 2012) in a full-page ad in USA Today: http://www.eweek.org/Site/pdfs/USA_Today_Ad.pdf. Up to four others will be recognized on the EWeek Web site (www.eweek.org). Sampathkumar Veeraraghavan, IEEE’s 2011 New Face, was honored for his humanitarian work with women and children in India: http://www.ieeeusa.org/communications/releases/2011/030111.asp.

“College Edition” Program

The “New Faces of Engineering: College Edition” is for third-, fourth- and fifth-year IEEE student members enrolled in a bachelor of science engineering program at an ABET-accredited college or equivalent international institution, and have a minimum grade-point average of 3.0. The initiative is designed to recognize students whose academic success, contributions and experiences in engineering have them poised for future success.

The application is available on Facebook at www.facebook.com/CollegeEdition. Winners will be featured on the page, and their hometown and college newspapers will be notified. The nomination deadline is also 21 October 2011.

Sponsored by more than 100 engineering, science and education societies, as well as major corporations dedicated to increasing public awareness and appreciation of engineering, EWeek is celebrated annually by thousands of engineers, engineering students, teachers and leaders in government and business. IEEE served as lead society during EWeek 1993 and 2004, and will serve again in 2014.

Battelle and ASME are EWeek 2012 co-chairs.

 

Paid Summer 2012 Internship At Mass Media News Outlet Available to U.S. IEEE Student Members; Helping Journalists Communicate Authoritatively to the Public on Science, Engineering and Technology

WASHINGTON (24 September 2011) — A paid summer 2012 internship at a mass media news outlet is available to a U.S. IEEE student member who can help journalists in print or broadcast fields communicate authoritatively to the public about science, engineering and technology.  

IEEE-USA is seeking applications from U.S. IEEE undergraduate and graduate student members to work full-time June-August 2012 as a reporter, researcher or production assistant in a mass media organization — including radio and TV stations, newspapers and magazines — both print and electronic. Applications are due by 15 January 2012.

In addition to receiving a weekly stipend and travel expenses, IEEE-USA Engineering Mass Media Fellows gain valuable work experience and sharpen their communication skills as they report on today’s sci-tech news for the general public. IEEE-USA Engineering Mass Media Fellows have been assigned to such media outlets as The Los Angeles Times, the Voice of America, Scientific American and WNBC-TV.

2011 IEEE-USA Engineering Mass Media Fellow Brandon Blakeley interned for 10 weeks this past summer at The Oregonian in Portland, Ore. His first story appeared on the front page of the newspaper’s Living Section and described how Twitter “has become a trove of human language and interactions unmatched in size, detail and availability.” Go to:

www.oregonlive.com/living/index.ssf/2011/06/tweet_talk_from_the_associatio.html

Blakeley considered his “best story” a look at “why spiders don’t get stuck to their webs,” which appeared on the front page of a Saturday Oregonian. See:

www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2011/07/inquiring_minds_want_to_know_w.html

Since 2000, 14 U.S. IEEE undergraduate and graduate students have served as IEEE-USA Engineering Mass Media Fellows. IEEE-USA is the only engineering organization in the Mass Media Fellows program administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

The AAAS program, begun in 1974, has placed some 600 fellows who have filed hundreds of stories in print and electronic media. To download a AAAS application, go to:

www.aaas.org/programs/education/MassMedia/apply.shtml

For more information on IEEE-USA participation in the AAAS program, and to print out a flyer on the activity, see:

www.ieeeusa.org/communications/massmedia.asp

 

Median Income of Electrotechnology, IT Professionals Rises to $118,000; Communications Technology Workers Report Highest Income, IEEE-USA Salary Survey Reveals

WASHINGTON (26 September 2011) — Median 2010 income for electrotechnology and information technology professionals rose nearly four percent from the previous year, according to the latest IEEE-USA Salary & Fringe Benefit Survey.

Median incomes from primary sources — salary, commissions, bonuses and net self-employment income — for U.S. IEEE members working full-time in their primary area of technical competence (job specialty) moved from $113,500 in the 2009 tax year to $118,000 in 2010, a 3.96 percent increase.

Of the record 17,030 U.S. IEEE members who responded to the Internet-based survey, 12,877 were employed full-time in their job specialty. Those working in communications technology reported the highest median income ($135,000), while workers in circuits and devices were second ($125,252). Those in signals and applications and engineering and human environment tied for third ($125,000).

On the other end of the spectrum, energy and power engineering professionals reported a median of $107,000, followed by industrial applications ($109,350) and systems and control ($110,000).

The IEEE-USA Salary & Fringe Benefit Survey, 2011 Edition, is the 24th compensation survey the organization has conducted since 1972. It also includes income data based on things like age, ethnicity, gender, experience and years with current employer. The results are valuable to companies seeking to know what type of compensation package they should put together to attract and retain electrotechnology and IT professionals, and to employees looking to benchmark their salary and benefits.

The IEEE-USA Salary Service offers annual subscribers access to an online salary calculator and survey reports (2009-11) for accurately benchmarking technical professionals’ compensation individually or organization-wide. The service combines the power of online relational databases, sophisticated regression modeling and data extracted from the annual IEEE-USA Salary & Fringe Benefit Survey. For more information, see https://ieeeusa.gallup.com.

‘IEEE-USA in ACTION’ App Available in iTunes Store

WASHINGTON (28 September 2011) – An app for “IEEE-USA in ACTION,” IEEE-USA’s quarterly electronic publication, is now available for download from the iTunes store. The app is free and compatible with iPad, iPod touch and iPhone.

See http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ieee-usa-in-action/id461081367.

“IEEE-USA in ACTION” highlights IEEE-USA programs, products, services and activities. This interactive online magazine features stories for technology professionals, polls, photo slideshows, commenting and the ability to share articles through social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter. The full page of a story can also be viewed without having to scroll.

The app contains six past issues and the fall 2011 issue (http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/ieeeusa/ieeeusa_fall11/index.php?startid=2#/1). The latter features articles on, among other things, IEEE members’ attitudes toward workplaces and careers, an e-book series on “Leading and Managing,” diary of a congressional fellow, high-energy visits to Capitol Hill and IEEE-USA’s student video competition.

Once the app is downloaded, new issues of “IEEE-USA in ACTION” will automatically be added to your device four times a year.

IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE. http://www.ieeeusa.org

IEEE-USA E-Book on Résumés First to be Offered Free as Special Benefit to IEEE Members

WASHINGTON (29 September 2011) — As a special benefit of IEEE membership, IEEE-USA will be offering one free e-book each month to IEEE members.

The e-book offering for October is “Engineers’ Guide to Lifelong Employability: On Résumés.” This e-book provides everything you need to know about creating and using résumé and cover letters — traditional to digital — in a convenient, easy-to-read format. In it you’ll learn:

* The basics of résumé formats, content and delivery
* How to update your résumé
* How to avoid common résumé blunders

“Your résumé should describe your skills and accomplishments plainly enough so that employers can tell within about a minute whether you fit their immediate staffing needs or not,” former IEEE-USA Employment & Career Services Chair Jean Eason said.

From Oct. 1 through Oct. 31, “Engineers’ Guide to Lifelong Employability: On Résumés” can be downloaded at www.ieeeusa.org/communications/ebooks  for free to IEEE Members. The nonmember price is $5.99. Members can purchase other IEEE-USA E-Books at deeply discounted prices and download other free e-books.
 
In November the free publication will be book two in the “Engineers’ Guide to Lifelong Employability” series: “Transitioning from School to Work.” In December it will be book three, “What Are You Worth?”
 
To learn about the many benefits of IEEE membership, visit http://www.ieee.org/membership_services/membership/join/.

Add comment October 8th, 2011

Last Call for IEEE MGA Awards Nominations: Deadline 15 October

You can help recognize the efforts of outstanding volunteers by nominating individuals for one of the prestigious IEEE Member and Geographic Activities (MGA) Awards.  Each award has a unique mission and criteria and offers the opportunity to honor distinguished colleagues, inspiring teachers, and corporate leaders.

If you know someone who has made substantial regional contributions through innovative projects, exemplary leadership, service, or by fulfilling the goals of transnational activities, please consider nominating them for one of the following awards:

·        MGA Larry K. Wilson Transnational Award
·        MGA Innovation Award
·        MGA Leadership Award
·        MGA Achievement Award
·        MGA GOLD (Graduates of the Last Decade) Achievement Award

Earlier this year, the MGA Awards and Recognition Committee and the IEEE Region Awards Chairs worked to pilot the MGA Outstanding Section Award submission process through an online portal.  Due to the success of this pilot, the portal is also being used for the submission of the above MGA awards.  Nominators can submit nominations, endorsers can upload endorsement letters, and reviewers can review and rank nominations, all within the online system.

Please visit the MGA Award Nomination web page to review the nominator guidelines and eligibility requirements, reference the step-by-step submittal instructions, and link to the portal for nominations.

The deadline for nominations is 15 October 2011.

Please note: As this is still a pilot program, all feedback about the new online portal is welcome, so that we may continually work to improve the IEEE MGA Awards process.  Please email questions and/or feedback to MGA Awards.

Add comment September 29th, 2011

IEEE NEWS

NEWS from IEEE-USA
2001 L Street, N.W., Suite 700
Washington, DC 20036-4910

IEEE Electric Vehicle Conference Seeks Technical Papers

WASHINGTON (18 July 2011) — IEEE International Electric Vehicle Conference (IEVC) organizers are seeking technical papers on the technology, standards and engineering of electric vehicles.

Accepted papers will be presented during the inaugural conference, 4-8 March 2012, at TD Convention Center in Greenville, S.C. They will also be published in conference proceedings and available through the digital library IEEE Xplore. The deadline for extended abstract submissions is 15 October.

For more on the specific types of papers being sought, as well as paper submission guidelines, see http://electricvehicle.ieee.org/cfp.html.

IEVC (http://electricvehicle.ieee.org/) is expected to draw electric vehicle engineers, manufacturers, utility experts, corporate executives, researchers, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, legislators and regulators, among others, to discuss the impact the electrification of transportation is having, and will have, on society and the electric grid. Smart Grid planners are interested in EVs because of the increased demand they are expected to have on the electricity delivery system.

Greenville has become a major hub of electric vehicle research because of the nearby presence of major auto manufacturers and the Clemson University International Center for Automotive Research (http://www.clemson.edu/centers-institutes/cu-icar/), a public-private partnership advancing automotive safety, testing and design.
 
For sponsorship opportunities and more information on the conference, contact Lee Stogner at l.stogner@ieee.org.

IEEE Electric Vehicle Committee Chair and former IEEE-USA President Russ Lefevre is one of the event organizers. IEEE-USA is a financial cosponsor.

 

**IEEE-USA IN ACTION** IEEE.TV AIRS “ENGINEERING OUR FUTURE” SPECIAL ON FORUM CONVENED FOR HOLLYWOOD DIRECTORS TO TELL ENGAGING, REALISTIC STORIES ABOUT ENGINEERING

WASHINGTON (1 September 2011) — IEEE.tv is airing a special public access presentation on “Engineering Our Future: Because Dreams Need Doing” at https://ieeetv.ieee.org/ieeetv-specials

The “Engineering Our Future” forum was convened for some 150 Hollywood professionals by The Science and Entertainment Exchange, a program of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), in collaboration with IEEE-USA. It was held at the Directors Guild of America in Los Angeles on 9 June.

According to Frances Arnold, one of the three Hollywood forum panelists, and Dickinson Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry at the California Institute of Technology: “Science is a limitless source of ideas, and engineering is both cool and fun. Filmmakers like those here tonight need to spread the word to young people that engineering gives you the tools to change the world.”

During the program, Dr. Arnold, who creates new biological molecules and organisms by forcing their evolution in the laboratory, stated: “I began my career by studying astronomy, but found that I didn’t need to look to the stars for wonder or magnificent complexity — it was all around me in the cellular world. I now study how nature solves problems so I can then figure out how to solve others.”

Maja Mataric, who develops socially assistive robots that provide personalized human-machine interaction, explained that robots can assist individuals with autism, in stroke rehabilitation, and those with Alzheimer’s and dementia. As she noted, they never get tired and minimize embarrassment. Added Dr. Mataric: “People respond to co-present, physical caregivers. They form relationships, even with machines.” She is an IEEE Fellow and professor of computer science, neuroscience and pediatrics at the University of Southern California.

Randi Wessen, who has worked on multiple spacecraft searching for Earth-like planets around other stars, asserted: “When it comes to space exploration, we’re not even out of the driveway. We’re  only exploring things in our front yard.” Dr. Wessen is deputy manager of the Project Formulation Office at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL).

Jon Spaihts, screenwriter for Ridley Scott’s forthcoming “Alien” prequel, “Prometheus,” and the Hollywood forum’s moderator, enthused: “I’ve been a geek since I was a fetus…I hope this auditorium is filled with storytellers whose imaginations are magnified by what they hear tonight, and think about things like chemistry and robots in ways they never have before. I know that these sorts of fertile conversations have directly influenced my own storytelling.”

JPL’s Wessen agreed: “The importance of a night like tonight is that it allows writers and filmmakers access to a rich world they can then integrate, making for far more compelling stories.”

For a recap of the Hollywood forum, see www.scienceandentertainmentexchange.org/blog/event-recap-engineering-our-future

IEEE-USA’s Vice President for Communications and Public Awareness Nita Patel escorted a group of IEEE volunteer leaders to the forum, one of several engineering awareness programs spearheaded by IEEE-USA. Patel noted that IEEE-USA is collaborating with the NAS Science & Entertainment Exchange “to increase public awareness of engineers and engineering through television, movies and games.”

Earlier, in 2004, IEEE-USA helped introduce “Primer,” the Sundance and Alfred P. Sloan award winning movie about engineering ethics and the creative process, in a special screening at the Motion Picture Association of America in Washington.

The Science & Entertainment Exchange connects entertainment industry professionals with top scientists and engineers from across the country to create a synergy between realistic science and engaging entertainment. Chartered by Congress in 1863 under an Act signed by Abraham Lincoln to provide crucial scientific advice to the nation, the National Academy of Sciences, a private, nonprofit institution, is uniquely positioned to draw on the expertise of thousands of men and women who have distinguished themselves in their respective fields in science.

For more information on The Science and Engineering Exchange,see www.scienceandentertainmentexchange.org/

For more on IEEE-USA public awareness activities, go to www.ieeeusa.org/communications/massmedia.asp

 

U.S. College Students Challenged to Create Videos for Younger Students on How Engineers Improve the World; $5,000 in Student Awards to Be Presented in 2011-12 IEEE-USA Online Engineering Video Competition  

WASHINGTON (18 August 2011) — IEEE-USA is challenging U.S. college students to create YouTube videos that reinforce for an 11-to-13-year-old “tweener” audience “How Engineers Make a World of Difference.”

The organization is seeking to tap the enthusiasm of U.S. college students to spark younger students’ creativity and ingenuity and to inspire their interest in learning about engineering. IEEE-USA also seeks to expand broader public understanding of engineering through the wide dissemination of these videos.

As part of its 2011-12 online engineering video competition, IEEE-USA will present awards totaling $5,000 in four categories to U.S. undergraduates and graduates who create the most effective two-minute personal video profiles:

— CONTENT/MESSAGE: $1,500 scholarship award for best conveying the message most closely aligned with the theme “How Engineers Make a World of Difference”
— PRODUCTION VALUE: $1,500 scholarship award for best production quality and most professional look to the video
— VIEWS: $1,500 scholarship award for the most viewed submission, as determined by the number of YouTube hits as of midnight Eastern Time on Friday, 27 January 2012
— EARLY SUBMISSION: Ten $50 Amazon gift cards totaling $500 to the first 10 students who submit online entries that meet the basic competition requirements

The IEEE-USA video competition is open to all U.S. undergraduate and graduate students regardless of academic discipline. However, at least one undergraduate or graduate participant must be a U.S. IEEE student member.

Entries must be submitted through YouTube by midnight Eastern Time on Friday, 27 January 2012. Winning entries will be announced and shown during Engineers Week, 19-25 February 2012, and will also be featured on PBS’ “Design Squad” website.

For more detailed information on how to enter, go to www.ieeeusa.org/communications/video_competition/.

 

DHS Chief Technology Officer, Massachusetts National Guard Adjunct General and U.S. Customs and Border Protection Official Headline Speakers at IEEE Homeland Security Conference

WASHINGTON (24 August 2011) — Daniel M. Cotter, chief technology officer of the Department of Homeland Security, will be a featured speaker at the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST 11) in November.

Mark S. Borkowski, assistant commissioner of U. S Customs and Border Protection; and Major General Joseph C. Carter, adjunct general of the Massachusetts National Guard, will join Cotter as featured speakers.

The Westin Waltham Boston in Waltham, Mass., USA, will host HST 11, 15-17 November 2011. It will bring together global science and technology thought leaders to foster homeland security technology innovation. The conference features a technical advisory committee of leading S&T experts from academia, national laboratories, federally funded research and development centers, the federal government and industry.

The event will showcase selected technical papers highlighting emerging technologies in cyber security; attack and disaster preparation, recovery and response; land and maritime border security; and biometrics, forensics and physical security.

For more on the featured speakers, see http://www.ieee-hst.org/featured_speakers/featured_speakers.html#cotter_bio.

HST 11 is produced by IEEE with technical support from DHS Science & Technology Directorate, the IEEE Biometrics Council and the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Raytheon, MITRE and IEEE-USA are providing organizational support.

More than 380 people attended the 2010 conference, including representatives from at least 11 foreign countries. Raytheon is the event platinum corporate sponsor, and Massport is the event gold corporate sponsor. For more information, visit www.ieee-hst.org or contact Robert Alongi at information@ieee-hst.org or +1 781-245-5405.

Add comment September 5th, 2011

IEEE NEWS

NEWS from IEEE-USA
2001 L Street, N.W., Suite 700
Washington, DC 20036-4910

Call for Grant Applications

The IEEE Foundation accepts grant applications from charitable organizations, for new and innovative projects in January, April and September. The next date for grant applications is 22 April. Please submit your grant application using the online form.

Grant Applications are reviewed by a committee of the IEEE Foundation Board of Directors or the IEEE Life Members Committee. Approval of grants and funding arrangements are announced within one month of each IEEE Foundation Board meeting or IEEE Life Members Committee meeting. Please submit your grant application using the online form.
 
The IEEE Foundation considers projects that:
1. Use technology for humanitarian causes
2. Improve math, science and technology education from pre-college through continuing education
3. Introduce pre-college students to engineering and science
4. Support professional development and conference participation for university students
5. Preserve and promote the history of IEEE associated technologies
6. Recognize major contributions to IEEE associated technologies. 
Please review the IEEE Foundation’s grant guidelines and direct your questions to foundation-office@ieee.org.

IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference Issues Call for Papers

WASHINGTON (11 March 2011) — IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference organizers are seeking technical and non-technical papers on topics related to the role technology can play in improving lives and creating business opportunities for people in emerging nations.

Accepted papers will be presented during the inaugural conference, 30 October — 1 November 2011, at the Renaissance Seattle Hotel. They will also be published in conference proceedings and available through the digital library IEEE Xplore. The abstract deadline has been extended to 30 March.

“We’re looking for all types of papers,” conference chair Paul Kostek said. “In addition to technical ones, we’d like to hear from people who have experience running humanitarian projects. We’re interested in what kind of challenges they faced and how they overcame them.”

Contributed papers, particularly in the following areas, are solicited:
— Health, Medical Technology and Telemedicine
— Disaster Warning & Response
— Water Planning, Availability & Quality
— Power for Off-Grid Users
— Power Infrastructure, Renewable & Sustainable Energy
— Connectivity & Communications Technologies (data/voice) for Remote Locations
— Educational Technologies
— Agricultural Technologies
— Humanitarian Challenges & Opportunities
 
PAPER SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

For information on submitting a paper, go to http://www.ieeeghtc.org/submissions.html. Submissions must describe original work not previously published or currently under review for publication in another conference or journal. Instructions can be found at  
(http://www.ieee.org/portal/cms_docs/pubs/confpubcenter/pdfs/samplems.pdf). The paper template is accessible at http://www.ieee.org/web/publications/pubservices/confpub/AuthorTools/conferenceTemplates.html.

GHTC 2011 is designed to gather scientists, engineers, technology professionals, academics, foundations, government and non-government organizations, as well as individuals engaged in humanitarian work to discuss and develop solutions for present and future humanitarian needs. An international conference, participants are expected from all over the world. For more information, see http://www.ieeeghtc.org/.  

For exhibit and sponsorship opportunities, contact Wah Garris at myintwa@ieee.org.

IEEE Homeland Security Conference Seeks Technical Papers, Posters, Tutorials

WASHINGTON (15 March 2011) — Organizers of the 2011 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST 11) are seeking technical papers, posters and tutorials in the following areas:

 * Cyber Security
 * Borders & Maritime Security
 * Attack & Disaster Preparation, Recovery & Response
 * Biometrics, Forensics, & Physical Security

Accepted papers will be published by IEEE and presented at HST 11 at the Westin Waltham Boston in Waltham, Mass., USA, 15-17 November 2011. At least one author of an accepted paper will be required to register for the conference and pay the conference fee.  

The event, 11th in an annual series, will bring together leading researchers and innovators working on technologies designed to deter and prevent homeland attacks, protect critical infrastructures and people, mitigate damage and expedite recovery. Input from international partners is encouraged.

Papers should focus on technologies capable of deployment within five years, particularly applied research addressing areas in which breakthroughs are needed. Proposals should be no more than 500 words. Tutorial and poster submissions should include a one-page abstract and one-page biography.

Important 2011 submission dates, by midnight eastern time:
 * Abstract & tutorial proposal deadline — 22 April
 * Tutorial acceptance notification — 13 May
 * Full paper submission deadline — 24 June
 * Paper acceptance notification — 29 July
 * Poster abstract submission deadline — 12 August
 * Poster acceptance notification — 26 August
 * Publication-ready paper deadline — 6 September
 * Tutorial presentation deadline — 9 November
 
All submissions must describe original work not previously published or currently under review for publication in another conference or journal. Instructions can be found at http://www.ieee.org/portal/cms_docs/pubs/confpubcenter/pdfs/samplems.pdf.

For more information on submitting papers, posters and tutorial proposals to HST 11, please visit http://www.ieee-hst.org/cfp/cfp.html or download http://www.ieee-hst.org/cfp/IEEE Call_for_Papers_2011.pdf .
For general information on HST 11, see http://www.ieee-hst.org/ or email information@ieee-hst.org.
 
Nearly 400 people attended the 2010 conference, including representatives from 11 foreign countries. The IEEE Boston Section (http://www.ieeeboston.org/) is producing HST 11 with support from IEEE-USA, the Department of Homeland Security Science & Technology Directorate, IEEE Biometrics Council, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Raytheon and MITRE. 

 Future Homes will be Energy Self-Sufficient, IEEE Green Technologies Conference Speaker Says

WASHINGTON (22 March 2011) — Can you imagine the day your home produced all the energy it needed and didn’t have to connect to the electric grid? Syracuse University Research Fellow Janet Marsden can.

Marsden, who’s working towards her Ph.D. in the Syracuse School of Information Studies, will present her case during the third-annual IEEE Green Technologies Conference, 14-15 April 2011, at the Hilton Hotel in Baton Rouge, La.

“We have created a grid which is so complex that it is unmanageable,” said Marsden on the 7 March radio program, “The Promise of Tomorrow” with Colonel Mason. “So because we have wireless architecture at this point, what we want to look at is a different way to approach the energy delivery problem.”

Marsden foresees the day homes and businesses have their own solar, wind and geothermal power-producing technology, as well as batteries to store excess energy. She thinks the electric-vehicle battery technology being developed by automobile manufacturers will evolve into applications for buildings.

“You make the house itself a charging station and you do the load balancing by putting the batteries there,” Marsden said. She added that because the U.S. electric grid is more than 100 years old, “we really need to look at what 21st century electrical generation needs to look like.”

To listen to Marsden’s interview, go to http://www.promiseoftomorrow.biz/bizradio/030711/030711.htm.

Because of increasing concerns about fossil fuel costs, supplies and emissions, scientists, engineers and entrepreneurs are more closely examining the commercial viability of renewable energy sources. The IEEE Green Technologies Conference aims to look at solar, wind, nuclear, geothermal, hydro and biomass technologies, among others, as well as alternative vehicle power sources such as fuel cells, gasoline and liquid natural gas electric hybrids and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

The conference is organized by IEEE Region 5 and the IEEE Baton Rouge Section. Sponsors include the Boeing Co., IEEE-USA, Louisiana State University, the city of Baton Rouge, Entergy, Kawasaki Rail Car and the U.S. Department of Energy. For more information and to register, see http://www.ieeegreentech.org. For the technical program schedule, go to http://www.ieeegreentech.org/TechConf/2011GreenConferenceProgram_3.13.11.pdf.

Texas Senator, Illinois Representative to be Honored for Science, Engineering & Technology Leadership

WASHINGTON (29 March 2011) — Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) and Rep. Daniel Lipinski (D-Ill.) will be honored with the 2011 George E. Brown Jr. Science, Engineering and Technology Leadership Award on Capitol Hill on 6 April.

Hutchison and Lipinski will receive their awards during a reception in the Rayburn Foyer of the Rayburn House Office Building from 5 to 7 p.m. IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen will make the presentation to Hutchison.

Hutchison serves on the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and is ranking member of the Space, Aeronautics and Related Sciences Subcommittee. In 2006 she was an original cosponsor of the Protecting America’s Competitive Edge Act, the National Competitiveness Investment Act and the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act.

Two of her amendments to the American Innovation and Competitiveness Act — to include NASA in inter-agency competitiveness and innovation efforts, and to focus increased funding for the National Science Foundation (NSF) on physical sciences, technology, engineering and math — were included in the America COMPETES Act of 2007. America COMPETES is designed to promote U.S. innovation and competitiveness so the United States can maintain its global leadership in science and technology, and create new jobs.

Lipinski is a member of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee. As chairman last year of its Research and Science Education Subcommittee, he helped lead House passage of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. He is now the subcommittee’s ranking member.

Lipinski holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and a master’s in engineering-economic systems. He has for the past six years sponsored the House resolution recognizing the goals and ideals of National Engineers Week. http://lipinski.house.gov/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1398&Itemid=59

Lipinski also cosponsored “IEEE Engineering the Future Day,” the 2009 House resolution that recognized IEEE on its 125th anniversary. http://www.ieeeusa.org/communications/releases/2009/051309.asp

The event will also feature a number of exhibits demonstrating how a strong federal commitment to scientific and engineering research spurs U.S. economic growth. “A Hands-on View of Planet Earth,” from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology, will include real-time demonstrations of seismic and other activities that can change people’s lives in an instant. The recent earthquake and tsunami in Japan will be highlighted.

The George E. Brown Jr. Science, Engineering and Technology Leadership Award is presented annually by the Science, Engineering and Technology Work Group (SETWG) to members of Congress who are effective advocates of federal investment in science and technology. It is named for the late Rep. George E. Brown Jr., a longtime member of Congress who made outstanding contributions to federal support for science and technology throughout his congressional career.

The award is presented annually in conjunction with SETWG’s Congressional Visits Day (CVD), the preeminent yearly event during which hundreds of scientists and engineers from around the country come to Washington for two days of briefings and visits to their members of Congress. About 250 people are expected to participate in 2011 CVD events (6-7 April). www.setcvd.org

SETWG, of which IEEE-USA is a member, is an information network of professional, scientific and engineering societies, higher education associations, institutions of higher learning and trade associations. It is concerned about the future vitality of the U.S. science, mathematics and engineering enterprise. http://www.agiweb.org/cvd/setwgrst.html

This news release is available at http://www.ieeeusa.org/communications/releases/2011/032911.asp.

Congress to Hear Testimony Today in Support of IEEE-USA’s High-Tech Immigration Position

WASHINGTON (31 March 2011) — Bruce Morrison, a former member of Congress and chairman of Morrison Public Affairs Group, will testify in support of IEEE-USA’s high-tech immigration position on Capitol Hill today.

Morrison is one of four witnesses who will speak before the House Judiciary Committee Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement. The hearing — “H-1B Visas: Designing a Program to Meet the Needs of the U.S. Economy and U.S. Workers” — will be in the Rayburn House Office Building, room 2141, at 10 a.m.

Here are excerpts from his written testimony:

“It is clear from the debates over H-1B during the past 15 years that there will be continuing controversy over the ‘right’ contours for that category. You are hearing different views on that controversy today. But while this debate continues, there is a more pressing problem that can and should be addressed: facilitating the employment of the many advanced-degree graduates of STEM* programs in America’s top universities. While the percentages vary by school and program, it continues to be the case that a majority of these graduates are foreign-born. This statistic should be a matter of concern, and an effective response to the underrepresentation of American students in STEM graduate programs is imperative. But this condition has existed for decades and any correction will take decades, as well.”

“In May and June, another class of advanced-degree STEM graduates will join the workforce. Whose welcome mat will be most attractive? America has always won this competition in the past, but our competitors are increasingly aggressive in pursuit of this talent pool. And globalization has made it easier for multinational companies to go where the talent goes, rather than insist that the talent stay in America. With our unemployment so high, we desperately need to hold onto these jobs — those filled by Americans and those that can be filled by foreign-born graduates on their way to becoming Americans — as well as the jobs that their work will create.”

“In short, there are no problems for which green cards are not a better solution than temporary visas. And there are no problems with the H-1B program itself that a system built on green cards will not help to fix. So we are asking this subcommittee to change the subject — from H-1B to green cards — at least long enough to address the opportunity to retain this spring’s new STEM graduates permanently in America and to help their predecessors to not continue having to wait in endless lines for their dates to come up in the green card queue.

“Today the bipartisan leadership of the Judiciary Committee and this subcommittee received a joint letter from IEEE-USA and the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA). It is remarkable. Organizations composed of the largest high-tech employers on the one hand, and the largest organization of high-tech workers on the other, agree that Congress should focus on green cards, not guest worker visas. This is a sign pointing in the direction that we hope this subcommittee will go.”  

* STEM is science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Morrison’s entire written testimony is available at http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/policy/2011/033111b.pdf.

IEEE-USA’s joint letter with SIA in support of green cards is at http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/policy/2011/033111a.pdf

For more on IEEE-USA’s position on “Ensuring a Strong High-Tech Workforce through Educational and Employment-Based Immigration Reforms,” see http://www.ieeeusa.org/policy/positions/Immigration1110.pdf.

April 4th, 2011

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IEEE/IEEE-USA’s New Face of Engineering Honored for Technological Innovations Benefiting Women and Children

WASHINGTON (1 March 2011) — Sampathkumar Veeraraghavan was recognized as the IEEE/IEEE-USA’s 2011 New Face of Engineering during National Engineer Week for developing technological solutions that improve the lives of disabled and impoverished women and children in India.Veeraraghavan was one of 14 engineers recognized for this international honor and featured in a full-page ad in USA Today on 21 February: http://www.eweek.org/Site/Engineers/newfaces2011/EWEEK_New_Faces.pdf   I’m humbled by this honor and would like to dedicate it to the disabled children that benefit from our programs,” Veeraraghavan said. “The recognition has motivated me to strongly pursue my passion toward designing engineering solutions to solve global humanitarian issues. In coming years, I will continue working to develop more technological solutions, and will strive hard to bring many more positives changes to the living conditions of people with disabilities.” Engineers Week (EWeek) was celebrated in the United States 20-26 February.Veeraraghavan, 27, is a component design engineer with the Intel Corp. and lives in Hudson, Mass. He earned his master’s degree in electrical engineering from Tufts University in Medford, Mass., in May 2010.After graduating from India’s Anna University with a bachelor’s degree in computer science and engineering in 2005, Veeraraghavan visited a local school for developmentally disabled children in Chennai, India, where he saw children with autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome and other disorders. Their needs varied so much that proper therapy was impossible.So he and a group of medical professionals developed the Automated Screening System for Developmental Disorders, a 30-minute screening procedure that assists in the early detection of autism in children as young as 18 months.

According to a 2008 story in The Institute, the procedure “evaluates the child’s fine and gross motor, social, and language skills through 48 questions aimed at the primary caretaker, and includes artificial-intelligence gaming systems for the child. The screening system assigns each question or task a different numerical value that, when computed, add up to a score that could suggest symptoms of autism.”

The entire article is available at http://www.ieee.org/portal/site/tionline/menuitem.130a3558587d56e8fb2275875bac26c8/index.jsp?&pName=institute_level1_article&TheCat=1016&article=tionline/legacy/inst2008/may08/profile.xml&

Veeraraghavan recently created India’s first online database to collect and analyze information on the physically and mentally disabled. The Information System on Human and Health Services is helping to close the sizable gap in medical resources available to women and children in urban vs. rural areas. More than two million people in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu have been impacted by the system. Veeraraghavan has received numerous awards from IEEE and other organizations for his humanitarian work.The New Faces of Engineering program is sponsored by the National Engineers Week Foundation, a coalition of engineering societies, major corporations and government agencies. The program highlights the vitality, diversity and rich contributions of engineers under 30. They are honored annually during EWeek. IEEE-USA has participated in the program since its inception in 2003.A New Faces of Engineering, College Edition, is being started to promote the accomplishments of fourth- and fifth-year engineering students. It will highlight their academic success and student contributions to the industry and sponsoring society.

Discover Engineering Family Day Shatters Attendance Record; IEEE-USA Recognizes New Face of Engineering, Presents Awards at Future City Competition

WASHINGTON (25 February 2011) — Discover Engineering Family Day drew a National Building Museum one-day record 13,994 visitors on Saturday 19 February to kick off National Engineers Week activities in the nation’s capital. IEEE-USA, which played a leadership role in the launch of the first Family Day in 1993, is one of the event’s major sponsors.Family Day introduces children to basic engineering concepts with hands-on and thought-provoking activities. At IEEE-USA’s exhibit, children learned about what type of materials conduct electricity and how basic electrical circuits and light bulbs operate. See Washington FOX 5 coverage at http://www.myfoxdc.com/dpp/mornings/holly_live/holly-morris-discover-engineering-family-day-021811#On Tuesday, IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen presented awards to two teams at the Future City Competition National Finals: the third-place award to Davidson (N.C.) IB Middle School; and the Best Communications System Award to the Alexander Dawson School of Las Vegas. The third-place team will receive a $2,000 scholarship from IEEE-USA for the school’s science and technology program. IEEE-USA EWeek liaison Murty Polavarapu and fellow Virginia IEEE member Kiki Ikossi judged the communications award. Each of those students will also receive a $100 U.S. Savings Bond.The Future City Competition (www.futurecity.org), conceived in IEEE-USA offices in 1993, is designed to promote technological literacy and engineering to middle school students. Under the guidance of an engineer/mentor and teacher, children create their own vision of a future city, working first on computer and then constructing three-dimensional scale models. The students also have to write an essay about a predetermined challenge the city might face.More than 1,100 schools and 33,000 students from across the United States competed during the 2010-11 season. Thirty-five regional champions earned a trip to Washington for the National Finals.  Sampathkumar Veeraraghavan was recognized as the IEEE/IEEE-USA New Face of Engineering. An electrical engineer and recent graduate of Tufts University, Veeraraghavan develops technological solutions to global humanitarian issues for disabled and impoverished women and children. He was one of 14 engineers featured in a full-page ad in USA Today on Monday: http://www.eweek.org/Site/Engineers/newfaces2011/EWEEK_New_Faces.pdfThe New Faces of Engineering recognition program is sponsored by the National Engineers Week Foundation, a coalition of engineering societies, major corporations and government agencies. The program highlights the vitality, diversity and rich contributions of engineers under 30. They are honored annually during Engineers Week.A New Faces of Engineering, College Edition, program is being started to promote the accomplishments of fourth- and fifth-year engineering students. It will highlight their academic success and student contributions to the industry and sponsoring society.

The Global Marathon For, By and About Women in Engineering and Technology will be staged across the globe 7-12 March. This Engineers Week event is an annual worldwide forum connecting professional women, college students and girls for virtual and in-person conversations about education and careers in engineering and technology. http://www.eweek.org/EngineersWeek/GlobalMarathon.aspx?ContentID=244

Electric Vehicles to Take Center Stage at IEEE-USA Workshop in Austin

WASHINGTON (25 February 2011) — The new Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf will be featured attractions at the IEEE-USA Electric Vehicles & Personal Transportation Workshop on Friday 4 March at the Renaissance Austin (Texas) Hotel. The event will explore the challenges and opportunities of electric vehicle transportation and feature eight panels of more than 20 technology, industry, academic and policy experts.Craig Eppling, a regional communications manager for General Motors, will discuss the Volt on the electric vehicle market panel. He will be joined by Mark Perry, director of product planning for Nissan America; and Rob Ferber, chief technology officer for KLD Energy Technologies. Ferber is a former science director at Tesla Motors and was responsible for Tesla’s early drive train integration of motor, controller and battery systems.The Volt, which uses electricity at all times to run the vehicle, has an all-electric range of 35 to 40 miles. After that, an onboard gasoline-powered generator recharges the lithium-ion battery to extend your driving range another approximately 340 miles. The Leaf is 100 percent electric and uses no gasoline. It has a driving range of about 100 miles when fully charged and has to be recharged to drive further. Both cars are plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and use regenerative braking.Other workshop focus areas include charging infrastructure; PEVs and the electricity business; customer acceptance; managing PEV loads; electric vehicle policy issues; PEVs and the electric grid; and personal electric transportation.In addition to the Volt and Leaf, personal transportation devices such as electric scooters and bicycles are also scheduled to appear.

The cost for the workshop, which includes a buffet breakfast, lunch, coffee breaks and a post-event reception, is $175 for IEEE members and $200 for nonmembers. It will run from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information and to register, see http://www.ieeeusa.org/calendar/workshops/EVPT/default.asp Exhibit and sponsorship opportunities are available by contacting Colonel Mason at colonel@prfirm1.com or 214-329-4949. You can follow previews of the workshop on the ScienceNews Radio Network (http://www.promiseoftomorrow.biz/). 

New IEEE-USA President Looks to Advance U.S. Innovation & Entrepreneurship

WASHINGTON (8 February 2011) — New IEEE-USA President Ron Jensen has identified advancing U.S. innovation, entrepreneurship and competitiveness as his priorities for 2011. “Engineers and technologists are innovators and job creators,” Jensen said. “The more technology specialists we unleash in the workforce, the better our opportunity to revitalize the U.S. economy. Our nation’s ability to innovate new products and services will help us to compete globally and create jobs in the United States.”Jensen, who became IEEE-USA president on 1 January, succeeds Evelyn Hirt. Jim Howard is president-elect.Jensen is encouraged by the recently announced public/private partnership, Startup America, and its potential to increase the number of new businesses that have high-growth, high job-creating potential. See http://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/startup-america  .IEEE-USA supports and promotes high-tech entrepreneurship through programs like its Entrepreneurs Village, TechMatch and IEEE Alliance of Consultants Networks. In 2009, IEEE-USA entered into a partnership with the Small Business Administration to assist high-tech entrepreneurs starting new ventures. Federal and state resources are available at http://www.ieeeusa.org/careers/entrepreneurs/resources.asp#SBA“I am especially interested in understanding how we can help our members become more innovative, entrepreneurial and competitive in the global economy,” Jensen said. “We have to understand what our members’ careers will be like 5 to 10 years from now and support their adjustment to that environment.”IEEE-USA will also work with other science and engineering organizations to encourage Congress to fund the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010. The legislation, which was signed into law in December, authorizes federal investment in science, engineering, innovation, technology and competitiveness. Its goal is to help the United States maintain its world technology leadership and to create jobs.Meet the New IEEE-USA PresidentRonald G. Jensen enjoyed a 40-year career with IBM. He held positions in semiconductor development and applications, chip development, system design, systems architecture, management and project management. He assisted in the development of several IBM families of computers and servers, and retired in 2009 as a chief engineering manager.Jensen’s professional interests range from systems architecture and embedded systems to technical education, management and strategic planning, to the use of the Internet, collaboration tools and social networking to build a professional environment.

Jensen became a student IEEE member in 1972, a member three years later and a senior member in 1999. He also holds membership in Eta Kappa Nu, the electrical and computer engineering honor society, and the Project Management Institute.

Jensen has held numerous IEEE volunteer leadership positions. Highlights include, among others, serving on the IEEE Board of Directors as Region 4 director in 2005-06, and chairing the IEEE Strategic Planning Committee in 2007-08. He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, Technology Management Council and Women in Engineering affinity group. He was honored with an IEEE Third Millennium Medal in 2000.

Jensen and his wife, Marlene, live on Lake Zumbro outside of Rochester, Minn. They have two grown sons, Joel and Ryan, and three grandchildren, Emily, Lily and Dane.

For more on Jensen, check out the December issue of IEEE-USA In Action: http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/ieeeusa/ieeeusa_1210/#/22/OnePage

March 4th, 2011

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A Million Electric Vehicles on the Road by 2015? Austin Workshop to Examine the Challenges and Opportunities

WASHINGTON (26 January 2011) — In last night’s State of the Union address, President Barack Obama called for the United States to “… become the first country to have a million electric vehicles on the road by 2015.”
      The IEEE-USA Electric Vehicles & Personal Transportation Workshop will explore the challenges and opportunities to make that vision a reality. The all-day event, at the Renaissance Austin (Texas) Hotel on Friday 4 March, will feature eight panels and more than 20 technology, industry, academic and policy experts.
     Workshop focus areas include the electric vehicle market; charging infrastructure; plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and the electricity business; customer acceptance; managing PEV loads; electric vehicle policy issues; PEVs and the electric grid; and personal electric transportation.
     The keynote speakers are David Strickland, administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the federal agency charged with electric vehicle implementation; and Karl Rabago, vice president for distributed energy services at Austin Energy.
     Dr. John Goodenough, a professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Texas, will lead a panel of battery researchers. He developed the cathode materials for the lithium-ion batteries that are used in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles.
     Goodenough will be joined by Joe Redfield, manager of the Advanced Vehicle Technology Section in the Engine, Emissions and Vehicle Research Division at Southwest Research Institute; and Dr. Don Hillebrand, director of the Center for Transportation Research at Argonne National Laboratory.
     Argonne is the nation’s lead research center “for the simulation, validation and laboratory evaluation” of PEVs and “the advanced technologies required for these vehicles.”
     The new Chevy Volt is scheduled to be at the event, along with personal transportation devices such as electric scooters and bicycles.
     The cost for the workshop, which includes a buffet breakfast, lunch, coffee breaks and a post-event reception, is $150 for IEEE members and $175 for nonmembers. For more information and to register, see http://www.ieeeusa.org/calendar/workshops/EVPT/default.asp.
      Exhibit and sponsorship opportunities are available by contacting Colonel Mason at colonel@prfirm1.com or 214-329-4949. You can follow previews of the workshop on the ScienceNews Radio Network (http://www.promiseoftomorrow.biz/).
     IEEE-USA advances the public good and promotes the careers and public policy interests of more than 210,000 engineering, computing and technology professionals who are U.S. members of IEEE. http://www.ieeeusa.org

 

February 7th, 2011

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IEEE-USA President Commends House for Passing Innovation Legislation

WASHINGTON (21 December 2010) — IEEE-USA President Evelyn Hirt commends the House of Representatives for passing the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 on Tuesday.

The legislation, which the Senate passed on 17 December, authorizes federal investment in science, engineering, innovation, technology and competitiveness, and is designed to help the United States maintain its world leadership in high-technology and create jobs. It will now go to President Barack Obama for his signature.

COMPETES strives to, among other things, prepare students for high-skilled, high-paying jobs by improving science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education; keeps basic research program budgets on a path to doubling at the Department of Energy Office of Science, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); reauthorizes the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E), which supports high-risk, high-reward transformational energy technology development; and provides loan guarantees “for a project that re-equips, expands, or establishes a manufacturing facility in the United States.”

“This legislation is important for the United States as it competes to retain global leadership in technology innovation, research and math and science,” Hirt said. “It will enhance needed economic growth and U.S. STEM education, while helping manufacturers become more competitive by supporting innovative manufacturing technologies.”

Rep. Bart Gordon (D-Tenn.), outgoing chairman of the House Science & Technology Committee, said on the House floor Tuesday that more than half of U.S. economic growth since the end of World War II in 1945 can be attributed to the development and deployment of new technologies.

“These investments are the path toward sustainable economic recovery and growth and the path toward prosperity for the next 50 years,” Gordon said. “There is an undeniable relationship between investments in R&D and the creation of jobs, the creation of companies, and economic growth.”

“COMPETES,” short for “Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education and Science,” is based on recommendations outlined in the 2005 National Academies’ report, “Rising Above the Gathering Storm.”

IEEE-USA, one of more than 750 organizations to endorse the legislation, worked to support its passage.

Major Upgrades to IEEE-USA Consultants Database Enhance User Experience

WASHINGTON (29 November 2010) — The IEEE-USA Consultants Database has been matching technical professionals and clients for years. IEEE-USA recently unveiled several major upgrades designed to enhance database functionality and improve the user experience.

New features include:

* Member database profiles now accessible on Internet search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing. Previously, profiles could only be found by searching the IEEE-USA Consultants Database.

* Form-based communications tools that prevent e-mail addresses from being harvested for spam

* Monthly Web viewing statistics for each member profile

* Improved filtering of employer assignment postings

For more on these and other upgrades, see the Alliance of IEEE Consultants Networks’ (AICN) Fall 2010 newsletter at http://www.ieeeusa.org/business/Newsletter/AICN-Fall-2010.pdf.

A one-year membership in the IEEE-USA Consultants Database is $79: http://www.ieeeusa.org/business/consultants/.

Through AICN, IEEE-USA promotes the interests of members working full-time or part-time as consulting engineers, computer professionals and project managers. Local networks provide their members with coaching and seminars on how to run a successful consulting practice.  

More IEEE-USA resources for consultants are available at http://www.ieeeusa.org/business/default.asp.

Cybersecurity a Shared Responsibility, White House Advisor Says at IEEE Homeland Security Conference

WALTHAM, MASS. (9 November 2010) — It’s not just government and private technology companies that are responsible for ensuring the safe and reliable functioning of our world’s interconnected computer systems.

“When it comes to cybersecurity, everyone has a role to play,” said Howard A. Schmidt, national cybersecurity coordinator and special assistant to President Barack Obama via video message Monday to attendees at the 2010 IEEE International Conference on Technologies for Homeland Security.

The 10th-annual peer-reviewed technical conference began Monday at the Westin Waltham Boston and continues through Wednesday.

Schmidt said there are steps we all can take to help keep the Internet secure: don’t visit suspect Web sites, download suspicious documents or attachments, or open e-mails from people you don’t know; have regularly updated anti-virus software installed on your computer, back-up your files frequently and educate children about potential online dangers.

“Together we can build a more resilient international community that is stronger and smarter than the determined adversaries we face every day,” he said. “Everyone has a role to secure their part of cyberspace, including the computers, devices and networks they use. We all need to understand how our individual actions can have a collective impact on cybersecurity and protecting the Internet.”

Much of the world depends on computer networks to communicate and conduct business. If those networks are compromised through viruses and other cyber attacks, the consequences could be deadly. For example, if computer-controlled street signals were to suddenly malfunction, vehicles could crash into each other.

“We rely on cyber networks to control and manage transportation, electricity and banking, just to name a few parts of our critical infrastructure,” Schmidt said. “Cybersecurity risks pose some of the most serious economic and national security challenges of the 21st century. Going forward, economic prosperity and our way of life depends on strong cybersecurity built on the backbone of resilient cyber infrastructure.”

The IEEE Homeland Security Conference is produced by IEEE with technical support from the Department of Homeland Security Science & Technology Directorate, the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society and the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society. IEEE-USA is providing organizational support. For more information, visit www.ieee-hst.org.

January 6th, 2011

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